Drumeco Archer: Rosamunde Carey runs polarized BAAA

By November 12, 2018

 Drumeco Archer believes president Rosamunde Carey runs a partisan executive and he plans to change that should he win the presidency of the BAAA on November 24.

When in 2015, he defeated incumbent secretary-general Carl Oliver, 46-36 to become the only member of Mike Sands’ administration to make it onto Carey’s executive, Archer had a message of unity.

“I feel that we have to become more unified. There is a conversation of one faction against the other, and that’s the primary reason why I feel we will remain divided. We have to change the conversation and I also feel that as secretary general, my job is to bridge the gap,” he said then.

“We have to do a better job of bringing our stakeholders together. Our primary stakeholders are athletes and coaches, and we must work together without fear or favour.”

However, what he has seen since is everything against the principles for which he stands.

“The following day after the elections of 2015, I made it clear publicly that I have reported to duty. And by that, I meant that I have come to be a part of this new administration. That obviously did not resonate true with this administration because what we have experienced is a fractured type of leadership where there was an executive within the executive that resulted in non-transparent decisions in many instances,” Archer told SportsMax.TV.

“There were decisions that were made without the inclusion of all members, and I think what that ultimately did was it divided the federation.

“This presidency is one that is polarised, one that was not prepared to engage the wider grouping of the membership, and that was reflected in the limited number of general meetings. I believe that we may have had three or four general meetings within the past three years of this administration.”

Archer remarked: “The general complaint has been that they had difficulty getting information out of the executive, the complaint is that they have not been a part of the decision-making process, the complaint that only a hand-picked number of people were apart any decision of any opportunity that may have arisen out of the process.”

He said he decided to challenge because he wants to have a more unified approach in an effort to save the sport in the Bahamas.

“I take a more integrated approach and I think that has been my success within my history with the BAAA. It doesn’t matter if I am seen to be your supporter or not, I deal with the issues and the issues have always been my primary focus, what is the ultimate objective, how we realise that,” he said.

“I decided to challenge because for the survival of the sport I believe we must take a less partisan approach. We must look at programmes driven by their own merit. You are excellent at what you do so you are deserving of the reward that you receive.

“Coming up through the ranks as an athlete and then becoming an administrator I recognized very quickly that if you can’t live out your vision through someone else then you must take on the mantle yourself. The decision to challenge the presidency became a natural progression for me because I really would wish for this organisation to be a different one. One that is driven based on results and the integration of a community of people where we can showcase the best talent and demonstrate that we can be leaders in the sport of track and field.

 

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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    1. 2019, Doha – 195,869
    2. 2015, Beijing – 194,547
    3. 2017, London – 193,426
    4. 2013, Moscow – 192,664
    5. 2009, Berlin – 191,168

     

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    1. 2019, Doha – 1024.75
    2. 2017, London – 1012.84
    3. 1999, Seville – 1007.98
    4. 2015, Beijing – 1004.78
    5. 2009, Berlin – 1004.55

     

    There have been many outstanding performances over the 10 days of competition with unprecedented depth in many of the finals. Based on the IAAF scoring tables, the top five men’s and women’s performances are:

     

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    22.91m Joe Kovacs (USA) shot put – 1295pts

    22.90m Tom Walsh (NZL) shot put – 1294pts

    22.90m Ryan Crouser (USA) shot put – 1294pts

    9.76 Christian Coleman (USA) 100m – 1291pts

    43.48 Steven Gardiner (BAH) 400m – 1289pts

     

    WOMEN

    7.30m Malaika Mihambo (GER) long jump – 1288pts

    48.14 Salwa Eid Naser (BRN) 400m – 1281pts

    48.37 Shaunae Miller-Uibo (BAH) 400m – 1272pts

    3:51.95 Sifan Hassan (NED) 1500m – 1271pts

    6981 Katarina Johnson-Thompson (GBR) heptathlon – 1269pts

     

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    The innovations – including light shows, new camera angles and increased engagement with athletes – have helped the sport reach a younger audience around the world.

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