Jofra Archer has shaken up the Ashes after living up to the hype on his Test debut, according to England captain Joe Root.

An intriguing finish to the second Test at Lord's was in store when England declared on 258-5 in the second session, setting Australia 267 to win or bat out the final 48 overs for a draw on Sunday.

It was the latter scenario which came to fruition as the tourists, missing Steve Smith because of the concussion he suffered following an Archer bouncer, batted out for a draw, meaning Tim Paine's side retained a 1-0 lead in the series.

However, in Archer – who returned match figures of 5-91 from a heavy workload of 44 overs – England have fresh optimism heading into the third Test at Headingley, with Smith's availability for an encounter that begins on Thursday in "serious doubt".

"He's come in and he really has made a massive impact, added a different dynamic to our bowling group," Root said at a news conference.

"I think [he] has given Australia something different to think about so it's really pleasing to see someone come in on Test debut and really shake up things and live up to the hype, even some of the hype that he put on himself.

"It's really pleasing to see and it makes for a very interesting last three games."

It was one of Archer's rockets that clattered into Smith's neck and knocked Australia's talisman down on Saturday.

Though Smith returned to complete his innings later that day, Australia announced on Sunday that he would play no further part at Lord's having shown concussion symptoms when he woke up.

Smith's concussion replacement in their XI, Marnus Labuschagne, then copped another vicious delivery on the helmet grille from Archer, who had sent back David Warner and Usman Khawaja inside the opening six overs.

Labuschagne survived that onslaught and went on to make a crucial 59, but Root feels Barbados-born seamer Archer can be instrumental as his side seek to retain the urn.

"He makes things happen when not many others in world cricket can," Root added.

"He's got such a unique action and way of bowling and natural pace which is always going to be in the game on any surface. When you've got that and the skill of the other guys around it, it makes for a tasty combination.

"It will make them think about what way they're going to combat how he's going to come at them.

"It's always nice when you're stood at slip and not batting against him. It's very different to the other options that we've had previously and have in this team, it's a different skill."

Australia captain Tim Paine lauded Marnus Labuschagne's commitment to the Ashes cause as Steve Smith's concussion replacement produced a gritty half-century in his side's draw with England.

Paine's team were set 267 to win inside 48 overs on the final day at Lord's after the hosts declared on 258-5 following a century from Ben Stokes (115 not out).

However, they were more concerned with batting out the day when Jofra Archer swiftly removed David Warner and Usman Khawaja to bring Labuschagne to the crease.

The 25-year-old was only thrust into the action as the first concussion substitute in Test history after Smith withdrew having been struck on the neck on Saturday by a bouncer from Archer, who then delivered a 91.6 miles-per-hour rocket that flew into Labuschagne's helmet grille and knocked him to the ground.

After receiving treatment on the field, Labuschagne went on to make a valuable 59, sharing an 85-run stand with Travis Head (42 not out) that took the game beyond England's reach – Australia eventually finishing with 154-6 to retain their 1-0 series lead.

"[It was] really pleasing for us to see him do that, particularly after the second ball he copped," Paine, speaking to Sky Sports, said of Labuschagne. 

"To get 150 kilometres per hour in the face and be able to stand up and play the way he did, for such a young player in Test cricket, was fantastic. Travis Head was the same."

Smith had returned to bat on Saturday following assessment from Australia's medical staff, yet it was confirmed on the final day that he would play no further part in the Test having displayed concussion symptoms in the morning.

Australia have said it is unlikely that their talismanic batsman will feature in the third Test, which begins at Headingley on Thursday.

"He's okay," Paine revealed.

"Obviously it was a really nasty knock. He felt okay yesterday and then, as concussions tend to be, [the symptoms were] delayed. He woke up, not feeling at his best today, so the decision was made to leave him out."

Asked whether he was happy that Smith was able to return on Saturday, Paine added: "I'm no doctor but we've got some professionals behind the scenes that make those decisions.

"Steve passed all his tests [on Saturday], was feeling okay. He deteriorated a little bit overnight, he retested, they weren't as good this morning so the medical professionals made that call.

"He will need to improve [to play at Headingley], there's no doubt about that, but hopefully for our sake he does improve in the next few days."

Australia overcame Steve Smith's absence and survived another venomous spell from Jofra Archer to draw the second Test with England and retain their slender advantage in the Ashes.

An intriguing, rain-affected encounter at Lord's concluded with neither side able to forge a positive result, despite England bidding to force the issue when declaring on 258-5 in the second session after Ben Stokes (115 not out) had posted a century.

Joe Root's attack had enough incentive with 48 overs remaining, while a target of 267 was also encouraging for the tourists, even if Smith was unavailable having displayed concussion symptoms on Sunday after copping an Archer bouncer on the third day.

Archer (3-32) dismissed David Warner and Usman Khawaja inside the opening six overs, but Smith's concussion replacement Marnus Labuschagne's gritty half-century effectively ended England's hopes, despite Jack Leach (3-37) striking with back-to-back deliveries and Joe Denly's brilliant catch, as Australia ended on 154-6.

Rain prevented play from starting for 70 minutes, Stokes and Jos Buttler (31) continuing their fifth-wicket stand in the first session to increase England's lead to 165.

Buttler top-edged Pat Cummins (3-35) to Josh Hazlewood at long leg after lunch before Stokes, then on 55, survived a review following an lbw appeal from Nathan Lyon.

Alongside Jonny Bairstow (30 not out), Stokes pushed on, dispatching Lyon over the ropes from successive deliveries as the advantage increased past 200.

A single to square leg gave Stokes his seventh Test century and Root called his batsmen in at the end of the following over to give Archer and his bowling colleagues an opportunity to level the series.

Archer provided early optimism when he snared Warner (5), who prodded to Rory Burns at gully to continue his dreadful Ashes, and then drew the edge of Khawaja (2), bringing Labuschagne, the first concussion substitute in Test history, to the crease.

There was no gentle introduction to Archer's searing speed as Labuschagne was caught flush on the helmet grille from his second delivery, a 91.6mph rocket that knocked him off his feet before he bolted back up.

Cameron Bancroft (16) was trapped in front by Leach but Labuschagne and Travis Head put on 85, with second slip Jason Roy shelling a chance to remove the latter when the alliance was worth 49.

Labuschagne (59) evntually fell in controversial circumstances, Root diving forward at midwicket to take a catch and benefitting from a soft signal of out when replays proved inconclusive.

As he walked off, the batsman expressed his disapproval to England's captain, whose team were soon celebrating again when Matthew Wade picked out short leg from Leach's next ball.

That gave the spinner three wickets - and Archer matched that total when Denly produced a fantastic one-handed catch to remove Tim Paine - but Head (42 not out) and Cummins (1 not out) ensured Australia held on.

Marnus Labuschagne endured a torrid start to his innings after becoming the first concussion substitute in Test history at Lord's

The right-handed batsman, standing in for Steve Smith, was hit on the helmet by a rapid bouncer from Jofra Archer, the ball rocketing flush into the grille, after Australia were set 267 to win the game and go 2-0 up in the series.

Labuschagne received treatment on the field but was able to continue his innings, reaching 17 not out as the tourists were 46-2 at tea.

Cameron Bancroft was the other unbeaten batsman on 16 after Archer had dismissed David Warner and Usman Khawaja, both left-handers edging behind during a fiery opening spell from the paceman.

Labuschagne was only featuring on the fifth day after being cleared to play as a replacement for Smith – ruled out for the remainder of the second match of the series due to a delayed concussion.

Smith was struck on the neck by a short ball from debutant Archer during Saturday's play and initially retired hurt.

While he did return to the middle to continue his innings after passing the required tests, eventually being dismissed for 92, the former captain woke up with "a bit of a headache and a feeling of grogginess" on Sunday, according to a statement from Cricket Australia.

Labuschagne's first involvement in the game was in the field, though his leg-spin bowling was not called upon as England made it to 258-5 before declaring during the afternoon session.

Ben Stokes finished up unbeaten on 115 – his seventh Test hundred – as the hosts left their opponents 48 overs to win a match hampered by rain.

Australia's immediate concern was on making sure they retained their advantage ahead of the third Test at Headingley next week – a task that quickly became tougher when they lost two early wickets.

Mitchell Johnson was disappointed by those in the Lord's crowd who opted to jeer returning Australia batsman Steve Smith during a dramatic fourth day of the second Ashes Test.

Smith was forced off hurt on Saturday after a rapid short ball from Jofra Archer struck the right-hander just below the helmet.

The 30-year-old left the middle but, after passing the required concussion tests, returned to bat later in the innings, eventually dismissed for 92 as Australia made 250 all out.

However, Smith did not field in England's second innings, with Australia confirming their former captain would play no further part in the Test - Marnus Labuschagne taking over as a concussion replacement.

While the majority of the Lord's crowd gave Smith - who has been the recipient of rough treatment from some England supporters throughout the series following his involvement in the 2018 ball-tampering scandal - a standing ovation when he made his way back out onto the field, some boos were audible, and Johnson was angered by such behaviour.

"One of the biggest disappointments for me was the crowd," said Johnson told ESPN Cricinfo.

"Not the whole crowd, obviously, but a couple of boos could be heard through the stump mic, and that really disappointed me when he came back out to bat.

"I don't care what people say, they can say 'yes, he's a cheat and that's why we're booing him', but that's a load of rubbish to me.

"Yes, he's done what he's done, and you can boo him at the start of play when he comes onto the field if that's how you feel. But for me, he's taken a heavy knock - two heavy knocks - but he's said, 'I can still bat here'.

"He's braved up, he's come through the concussion tests, and not many people would be able to do that."

Johnson also defended England duo Jos Buttler and Jofra Archer, who received some criticism on social media when a video circulated which appeared to show the players laughing while Smith received treatment.

"I was on the radio when it happened, and I found it quite difficult to speak at the time because of the way Smith hit the ground and lay there," Johnson said. "You could see he was moving around, but it obviously hurt him.

"In that situation they did everything they could as players. They made sure he was okay as best they could. They are not professionals in the medical world, so they have to leave that up to the professionals to make those decisions and sort that out.

"There was a bit of nervousness in the laughter. Archer was a bit shaken by it, he's a cool character, really calm, but you could tell in his eyes there was a little bit of concern there as well."

Ben Stokes made a century before Joe Root called him and Jonny Bairstow in prior to tea as England declared with a 266-run lead over Australia on the final day of the second Ashes Test.

In an intriguing encounter blighted by rain throughout the five days at Lord's, Root rolled the dice with England 258-5 and Stokes unbeaten on 115 in a bid to level up the series, giving his bowlers 48 overs in which to dismiss the tourists.

However, a victory target of 267 was also tantalising enough for Australia to think they could end up victorious.

Yet they were missing star batsman Steve Smith after it was confirmed he would play no further part in London due to the delayed concussion he suffered having been struck on the neck by a Jofra Archer bouncer on Saturday.

After the start of play was delayed by the elements, Stokes and Jos Buttler (31) put on 61 in the first session as England reached lunch on 157-4, a lead of 165.

Buttler failed to add to his total after the resumption, top-edging Pat Cummins (3-35) down to Josh Hazlewood at long leg.

Australia hoped Stokes would follow him back when he was on 55 as they reviewed an lbw appeal from Nathan Lyon but, after a lengthy delay due to issues with the technology, England's batsman survived.

Both Stokes and Bairstow (30 not out) upped the ante thereafter, the former sweeping Lyon (0-102) into the crowd from successive deliveries as the advantage moved beyond 200.

A single to square leg gave Stokes his seventh international century, his first since August 2017 and his second against Australia, at the ground where his heroics had helped deliver the Cricket World Cup for his country last month.

Root brought his batsman in following the completion of the next over, the 71st of the innings, in order to try and force the issue against an Australian side shorn of their key man.

Steve Smith is "hopeful" of being fit for the third Ashes Test after being ruled out of the final day at Lord's following symptoms of concussion.

Smith was hit on the neck by a Jofra Archer bouncer during Saturday's play in the second Test and, after being assessed by medics, he walked off the field of play.

The former Australia captain came back to the crease after Peter Siddle was dismissed but an erratic return ended when he left a Chris Woakes inswinger and was trapped in front for 92.

Smith therefore missed out on the chance to make a third successive century after he inspired Australia to victory by reaching three figures in both innings of the opening clash at Edgbaston.

With the next match of the series starting at Headingley on Thursday, Smith is targeting a rapid return.

"It's a quick turnaround between Test matches," said the 30-year-old. "I'm going to be assessed over the next five or six days, each day probably a couple of times a day, to see how I'm feeling and progressing.

"I'm hopeful I will be available for that Test match. It's certainly up to the medical staff and we'll have conversations, but it's certainly an area of concern, concussion, and I want to be 100 per cent fit.

"I think I've got to be able to train probably a couple of days out then face fast bowling to make sure my reaction time and all that sort of stuff is in place.

"There's a few tests I'll have to tick off and I guess time will tell."

Smith, who was also struck on the arm by Archer during a spell of searing pace from the debutant, revealed the neck injury is causing him discomfort and explained his condition has worsened since on-field tests were conducted.

"I started to feel a little bit of a headache last night, probably as the adrenaline came out of my system," he explained.

"I was able to get a good sleep, rare for me, but woke up a little bit groggy and with a headache again. Had some tests done and after further assessments it was deemed to be a mild concussion so I've been ruled out for the rest of this Test match.

"When I came off the ground the [concussion] tests were normal. I passed all the tests and felt fine, felt normal, so I was allowed to go back out and bat. Upon discussions with the doctor and the team coach, they were both happy and I was comfortable.

"The neck didn't have any real pain [on Saturday] when I touched it or when anyone else touched it. [Now] I do have a bit of pain there – whether that's some swelling or what, I'm not sure, so perhaps that’s leading to me having a headache and feeling a bit groggy.

"The arm feels pretty good, actually. It's quite a good bruise and bump I have on it but it's feeling a lot better. The movement I have on it is far greater than I had [on Saturday] and that feels really good."

As part of new concussion protocol rules, Australia have been permitted to replace Smith with Marnus Labuschagne for the remainder of the Lord's Test.

"With the tests that I've done and how I've felt this morning it's the right decision," said Smith.

"I'd obviously love to be out there trying to keep performing and help Australia win another Test match but I think the right decision has been made.

"I'll obviously be monitored pretty closely with the quick turnaround between Test matches and I'm hopeful I can make a recovery for that."

Smith bats without a neck guard on his helmet but indicated he will reconsider what protection he uses before he returns to action.

Ben Stokes reached his half-century as he and Jos Buttler nudged England along to 157-4 in a solid opening session for the hosts on day five of the second Ashes Test at Lord's.

On the ground where they helped England to Cricket World Cup glory against New Zealand last month, the duo dug in to stretch their fifth-wicket partnership to 86.

After a delayed started due to rain, England's batsmen rode their luck at times but escaped unscathed, in the process extending the lead to 165.

Steve Smith was absent from the field after the tourists confirmed he would play no further part in the contest due to a delayed concussion, Marnus Labuschagne cleared to replace the batsman for the remainder of the contest.

Stokes got England up and running with successive boundaries before Australia wasted a review when challenging an unsuccessful lbw appeal against the all-rounder.

David Warner was close to pouncing on a thick Stokes edge, which trickled down to third man for four runs.

Nathan Lyon (0-65) had Stokes prodding following that near-miss, but the Durham man stood firm, reaching 50 prior to the interval.

With Buttler (31 not out) keeping things steady at the other end, Lyon continued to test Stokes as lunch approached, though Australia could not find a breakthrough.

Joe Root will have to work out how long England will bat on before deciding if it is worth risking a declaration, with the early rain cutting it down to 88 overs in the day.

Jofra Archer has acknowledged his heart "skipped a beat" after his short ball struck Steve Smith on the neck.

Smith was forced to retire hurt after Archer's fierce delivery hit him just below the helmet on day four of the second Ashes Test at Lord's.

Australia's former captain later returned to the crease and was eventually dismissed for 92 as Australia posted 250 - eight shy of England's total. The hosts extended their lead to 104 with six wickets still in hand by the close of play on Saturday.

Archer, who clocked a top speed of 96.1mph during his Test debut, enjoyed a fine performance, taking 2-59 from 29 overs.

But the 24-year-old revealed his immediate concern over Smith's safety when he saw the Australian, who will take no further part in the second Test due to delayed concussion, go down.

"To see him go down, everyone stopped and everyone's heart skipped a beat," Archer told Test Match Special.

"After he got up he was moving around and you breathe a sigh of relief. No-one wants to see anyone getting carried off on a stretcher."

Archer also confirmed he was not attempting to hurt Smith - who has been the stand-out performer in the series so far - but rather stick to England's plan to get the Australian out.

"Honestly, I don't know what I was thinking [about Smith's injury]," Archer said in an interview with Sky Sports prior to the fifth day's play.

"You don't want to see anyone miss a day or another game, especially with what happened a few years ago [with the death of Phillip Hughes] as well. It's never a nice sight.

"I've never seen Smith get out of his own accord until yesterday, so I was just trying to rattle him.

"I was trying to get him out - I had a short leg and a leg slip and he was trying to work the ball off his hip, so if one bounces a bit more it should go to short leg, or one of the guys waiting.

"It's been like that a lot of the series really, a lot of balls haven't gone to hand, landing in the gap, so yesterday was just great seeing him get out without scoring 100."

The Australian Cricketers' Association (ACA) has condemned sections of the Lord's crowd for jeering Steve Smith after the batsman sustained a blow to the neck in the second Ashes Test.

Having already taken a hit to his forearm which required treatment, Smith was forced to retire hurt when a short ball from Jofra Archer thumped into him just below the helmet.

Australia's former captain was clearly frustrated at having to cut short his innings on medical advice, though he came back out to bat later in the session. He was eventually dismissed by Chris Woakes for 92 as the visitors reached 250 all out in their first innings.

The 30-year-old was, in the main, warmly received when he left the pitch and also as he made his way back out to bat, though some boos could be heard on his return to the middle.

Smith, along with team-mates Cameron Bancroft and David Warner, has been booed by sections of the crowd during the ongoing Ashes series following the trio's involvement in the 2018 ball-tampering scandal.

The ACA, however, has criticised the behaviour in the case of Smith's injury, while also praising the protocols followed by Australia's medical staff.

"The overnight events at Lord's show the importance of the concussion protocols which have been developed in Australia over the last few years," a joint statement from ACA president Greg Dyer and chief executive officer Alistair Nicholson said.

"Administrators in Australia working with the ACA and now the ICC have done a good job in putting the protocols in place. Plainly, they are necessary to protect the players who are struck.

"This is a workplace for these players. The reality is that cricket can be a dangerous sport, especially when the bowling is as ferocious as it has been in this series.

"To see the protocols practiced at Lord's overnight was important and correct. What was unwelcome and incorrect was the sound of booing of an injured player.

"Cricket deserves much better than that. And Lord's, the home of cricket, deserves much better than that also. What we witnessed was bravery from an outstanding young man. It should be commended not vilified.

"Over the English summer, generally the crowds have been terrific and really added to the contest. But when someone is hurt, yet the boos continue, it's time to call 'enough'.

"At any rate, the players have already served the toughest penalties in the history of cricket. Surely it is time to move forward."

Smith's injury prompted immediate concern, with Australia coach Justin Langer acknowledging the incident brought back painful memories of Phillip Hughes' death.

"You never like seeing your players get hit like that," Langer told a news conference. "There's obviously some pretty rough memories of a blow like that. So there's no fun in it."

Australia opener Hughes died after being struck on the back of his neck during a Sheffield Shield game in November 2014.

Australia will be without Steve Smith for the remainder of the second Ashes Test after their talismanic batsman was ruled out with delayed concussion.

Smith went off injured after being struck on the neck by a fierce delivery from Jofra Archer on day four, though returned to bat in Australia's first innings at Lord's.

The 30-year-old was eventually dismissed on 92, as Australia made 250 all out, eight shy of England's first-innings total, with the hosts extending their lead to 104 by the close of play.

However, Smith did not return to the field at the start of day five and Cricket Australia (CA) confirmed the former captain will sit out the rest of the Test after he complained of a headache on Sunday.

A CA statement read: "Steve has been closely monitored by medical staff overnight and this morning reported that after sleeping well, he woke with 'a bit of a headache and a feeling of grogginess'. 

"Steve reported that his left arm which was also struck during his innings yesterday was 'much better'.

"As part of the Cricket Australia concussion protocol, repeat concussion testing of Steve Smith was also performed this morning and demonstrated some deterioration from his testing which is consistent with the emergence of the symptoms he was reporting.

"On that basis Steve has been withdrawn from the match by team doctor Richard Saw."

Smith's absence will present a real blow to Australia, with the Test hanging in the balance, though Tim Paine's side have been allowed by the ICC to replace the 30-year-old with Marcus Labuschagne

The ICC introduced new rules prior to the Ashes for concussion replacements, though the incoming player, who will be allowed to bat and bowl, must be deemed a "like for like" replacement.

CA confirmed Smith – who will have a precautionary scan on his neck on Sunday – will continue to be monitored ahead of the third Test, which begins at Headingley on Thursday.

Rain caused a delayed start to the final day of the second Ashes Test but England and Australia were set to resume their intriguing battle at Lord's prior to lunch.

Umpires Aleem Dar and Chris Gaffaney announced play would get under way at 1210 local time (1110 GMT) following an inspection.

The home side will resume on 96-4 in their second innings, meaning a lead of 104 runs. Ben Stokes and Jos Buttler will be back out in the middle, the pair having survived a tricky period of play late on day four to reach the close unbeaten on 16 and 10 respectively.

Yet it was the duel between England paceman Jofra Archer and Australia talisman Steve Smith that was the major talking point following Saturday's action at the home of cricket, the latter felled a bouncer and forced to retire hurt on 80.

The right-hander did return later in the innings, though, adding a further 12 runs before he was trapped lbw by Chris Woakes, the tourists eventually bowled out for 250 in reply to England's first-innings score of 258.

Australia lead the series 1-0 after a 251-run victory in the opener at Edgbaston.

Steve Smith receiving a sickening blow from a Jofra Archer bouncer on day four of the second Ashes Test jabbed at painful memories of Phillip Hughes' tragic death for Australia coach Justin Langer.

Lord's was enraptured by a gripping passage of Test match action as Smith sought to stand firm in face of a ferocious barrage from debutant England paceman Archer.

Having worn a lifting delivery on the forearm, Smith was left prone on the turf when he ducked into an Archer bouncer, prompting immediate concern.

Australia opener Hughes died after being struck on the back of his neck during a Sheffield Shield game in November 2014. David Warner, Travis Head, Nathan Lyon, Mitchell Starc and Brad Haddin – all members of the Australia touring party – played in that match at the SCG.

"You never like seeing your players get hit like that," Langer told a news conference. "There's obviously some pretty rough memories of a blow like that. So there's no fun in it."

Smith appeared frustrated to have to leave the field after a lengthy medical assessment but, after coming through concussion tests, he returned when Peter Siddle was out caught behind to Chris Woakes.

The same bowler removed Smith for 92 – comfortably the most significant contribution to Australia's 250 all out before England closed on 96 for four, a lead of 104.

"As soon as he got up in the medical room he was saying, 'I'm going okay'. The doctor said he had passed the concussion tests," Langer explained.

"As soon as he got back in the dressing room he was ready to go back out there again. These are like my sons. You're never going to put them in harm's way.

"He said, 'I can't get up on the [Lord's] honours board unless I'm out batting'. All he was concerned about was that he wasn't going to play his forward defence because his arm was hurting for his top-hand grip.

"I asked him privately two or three times and in front of the group and he said, 'All good, coach'. What else do you do?"

Langer also paid tribute to a spell of fast bowling for the ages from Archer.

"I've got massive admiration for Jofra. I think he's an unbelievable athlete and an incredibly skilful bowler," he said.

"Test match cricket is hard work but his endurance was outstanding today – his skill, his pace. What an athlete and what a great player to have to promote Test cricket.

"To bowl 29 overs today, time will tell if it has an impact. We hope it does, like we do with all the England bowlers, like they would with our bowlers."

Australia will look to extend their 1-0 lead in the five-match series on Sunday but could have been in an even stronger position, having failed to review two lbw appeals against Rory Burns and the still-unbeaten Ben Stokes that would have gone in Nathan Lyon's favour.

"It's frustrating, there's no doubt about that," Langer added. "It can change a session, it can change a Test match, it can change a series.

"We're aware of it and we have to get better at it."

Chris Woakes conceded England's players were concerned for Steve Smith's welfare after Jofra Archer struck Australia's star batsman with a brutal bouncer at Lord's.

Smith once again top scored for the tourists with 92 in 250 all out, a miserly first-innings deficit of eight that felt far less significant in the overall reckoning than England closing day four on 96 for four.

But the 30-year-old left the field as a precaution having ducked into a bouncer during a rapid spell from Test debutant Archer that struck him on the neck and left him prone on the turf.

It was a moment to evoke unwelcome memories of Phillip Hughes' tragic death in 2014 and, even though he was fielding in the deep, Woakes had no doubt over the severity of the incident.

"I was down at fine leg but you get a feel as a player when someone gets hit, by the noise more than anything," the all-rounder told a post-match news conference.

"You could hear it was more fleshy, around the neck. When that's the case you're immediately worried as a player.

"Jos [Buttler] at short leg was in straight away to check he was okay, which was nice to see. You don't wish that on anyone.

"For Steve to come back out after being hit the way he was shows courage and character. He's been incredible in this series."

Woakes eventually claimed the prized wicket of Smith amid figures of 3-61, trapping him lbw without playing a stroke.

"I suppose it is strange because he hasn’t left any on the stumps all series so far! He'd just come back out, he hoyed me over midwicket for a one-bounce four," he said when asked whether he felt Smith was out of sorts having returned to the field when the Warwickshire man had Peter Siddle caught behind.

"I don't know if he was trying to get to three figures as quickly as possible, I'm not too sure. It's a tough one to answer.

"He hasn't left one like that so far – I just thought it was a good piece of bowling!"

The spell that will live long in the memory, however, is Archer's astonishing stint after lunch, where he hit a top speed of 96.1 mph and also cracked Smith painfully on the left forearm.

"Not personally, on the field," Woakes replied when asked if he had ever witnessed a quicker piece of bowling.

"You see quick bowling around the world but that was a prolonged spell of fast bowling.

"I don't know what the average was he was up around [90 mph] every ball. The atmosphere in the crowd, you could tell that it was pretty special. The crowd were certainly behind every ball

"It was special to be a part of. I haven't been on the field when someone's bowled that quick consistently."

Steve Smith braved a ferocious spell and a sickening blow from Jofra Archer to put Australia in a strong position heading into the final day of the second Ashes Test at Lord's.

Smith was unable to make it three centuries from as many innings in the series but the circumstances of this knock mean it might arguably live longer in the memory.

Once again anchoring the Australia innings and bringing up his half century after Matthew Wade edged the in-form Stuart Broad (4-65) to slip, Smith was subjected to a brutal going over from Test debutant Archer (2-59).

He needed padding and a bandage after the paceman whacked him on the left forearm before Lord's held its breath when a bouncer speared into Smith's neck and left him prone on the turf.

Australia's talisman left the field as a precaution but returned to fall for 92 in 250 all out, eight shy of England's first innings total.

England toiled early in their second innings, with Jason Roy (2), Joe Root (0), Joe Denly (26) and Rory Burns (29) all falling, and they closed on 96-4 with a lead of 104.

Burns pouching Wade for six in the morning session underlined the impression Smith was playing a different game to the rest of his colleagues in the Australian order, although his successor as captain Tim Paine (23) provided able support in a stand of 60 for the sixth wicket.

Paine fell to a short-leg catch by Jos Buttler off Archer, setting the stage for day four's exhilarating and frightening centrepiece.

Smith dropped the ball just short of Buttler from a delivery that clocked a remarkable 96.1 mph and he misjudged another vicious bouncer in Archer's next over to cause instant concern.

The medical advice to leave the fray appeared to displease Smith but he was back after Peter Siddle edged Chris Woakes (3-61) behind - the England all-rounder trapping Australia's main man in front after three more defiant boundaries.

Pat Cummins added a useful 20 and promptly got among England.

Roy's ordeal at the top of the order continued as he shovelled back a return catch before Root feathered a beauty behind first ball.

The hosts were reeling on 9-2 at that stage, leaving Burns and Denly to rebuild while riding their luck – both in terms of Australia's laxed review policy and David Warner's uncertain evening in the cordon.

Siddle took matters into his own hands with a return catch to claim the deserved scalp of Denly before having Burns caught behind.

Ben Stokes – afforded further lives by the errant Warner – and Jos Buttler did not always convince but were unbeaten on 16 and 10 respectively when rain brought a slightly early close.


EVENING ERRORS PREVENT AUSSIES FROM DRIVING HOME THE ADVANTAGE

Warner's toils with the bat at the hands of Broad so far in the series transferred to some shoddy work at slip as England tottered. Twice Paine failed to call for reviews that would have seen Nathan Lyon dismiss Burns and Stokes lbw. Both factors could prove costly in the final analysis of a rain-affected and low-scoring encounter.

ARCHER PROVES HE BELONGS

Where England's World Cup heroes have largely failed to fire with the bat since white ball switched to red, Archer left no doubt over his credentials with a spell for the ages. The rangy speedster taking on Smith truly was an "I was there" moment for all in attendance.

MOMENT OF THE DAY

After the thrill and concern of his joust with Jofra, there was a gladiatorial quality to Smith returning to the fray.

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