Great Britain duo Jess Learmonth and Georgia Taylor-Brown's unselfishness backfired when they were disqualified from a World Triathlon Olympic qualification event in Tokyo for crossing the line together.

Learmonth and Taylor-Brown came away from the rest of the field and finished a race, which was shortened due to the heat, hand-in-hand with broad smiles on their faces on Thursday.

Their joy was short-lived, though, as they were punished for causing a deliberate tie in the Tokyo 2020 test event.

Flora Duffy of Bermuda was subsequently awarded an unexpected victory, with Alice Betto taking silver for Italy and Vicky Holland ensuring there was one Brit on the podium.

Holland is quoted by BBC Sport as saying: "I really feel for Jess and Georgia because they raced exceptionally well today and I feel like they absolutely smashed it and deserved the first and second finish.

"I don't know how British Triathlon will choose things now. I wouldn't want to be a selector."

British Triathlon national performance director Mike Cavendish said: "It's obviously disappointing to have Jess and Georgia disqualified but it's a testament to the depth of our female squad that we still have another athlete on the podium."

Australian star Sally Pearson has announced her shock retirement from athletics, less than a year before the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

Pearson – the gold medallist in the 100-metre hurdles at the 2012 London Olympics – cited injuries as she ended her glittering career on Tuesday.

A two-time World Championships gold medallist with two golds at the Commonwealth Games, the 32-year-old revealed she had battled quad, calf, hamstring, knee and Achilles injuries in 2019 alone.

"The first day I was deciding this with tears in my eyes and a lump in my throat," Pearson, who won silver at the 2008 Olympics, told reporters. "That was really hard to take. I knew it was the right decision. Making a decision about something that has been a part of my life for 20 years was hard to understand in a way.

"I would love to have been a three-time Olympian. That disappoints me a little as well. At the same time, I am happy now. I'm relieved now that my career is over and there will be no more injuries and no more vomit sessions.

"The last few days have been really sad because today has been coming quicker than I would have liked. There have been a few tears the last few evenings which have been hard but that's just part of it."

Pearson, who was forced to miss the 2015 World Championships, 2016 Olympic Games and 2018 Commonwealth Games through injury, said a statement earlier on Tuesday: "I have prided myself on always being on the start line ready to win.

"I no longer believe I can achieve this. It is therefore with much regret that I have come to the conclusion that it is time to retire from this phase of my life and move on to the next.

"I love my sport and the friends I have made through it. I have had wonderful support from my family, my team, Athletics Australia, the AOC, my sponsors, the media and the fans – to them all I say thank you."

The 2020 Tokyo Olympics is scheduled to get underway on July 24 next year.

Caster Semenya has been denied the chance to defend her 800 metres World Athletics Championships title following a ruling by a Swiss court that has been welcomed by the IAAF.

The double Olympic champion had been given permission to race without restriction after lodging an appeal with the Federal Supreme Court of Switzerland (SFT) against the Court of Arbitration for Sport's (CAS) verdict in her case against the IAAF.

CAS ruled the IAAF could implement a regulation that would require Semenya to take medication to lower her testosterone levels to take part in women's track events ranging from 400m to a mile.

But on Tuesday a judge with the Swiss Federal Tribunal overturned the SFT's decision to allow Semenya to compete while it assessed the case in a move praised by the governing body of international athletics.

"The IAAF welcomes the Swiss Federal Tribunal's decision to revoke its Super-Provisional Order of 31 May 2019 after hearing the IAAF's arguments," a statement read.

"This decision creates much-needed parity and clarity for all athletes as they prepare for the World Championships in Doha this September.

"In the remainder of the proceedings before the SFT, the IAAF will maintain its position that there are some contexts, sport being one of them, where biology has to trump gender identity."

In her own response to the latest ruling, Semenya remained defiant.

"I am very disappointed to be kept from defending my hard-earned title, but this will not deter me from continuing my fight for the human rights of all of the female athletes concerned," she said.

Caster Semenya will not be able to defend her 800 metres title at the World Athletics Championships after a Swiss court reversed prior rulings that allowed her to compete while she appealed against controversial IAAF regulations.

The double Olympic champion was granted permission to race without restriction after lodging an appeal with the Federal Supreme Court of Switzerland (SFT) against the Court of Arbitration for Sport's (CAS) verdict in her case against the IAAF.

CAS ruled the IAAF could implement a regulation that would require Semenya to take medication to lower her testosterone levels to take part in women's track events ranging from 400m to a mile.

A judge has now overturned the SFT's decision to allow Semenya to compete while it assessed the case, and Semenya will consequently be unable to take to the track in Qatar.

A statement issued from the South African's camp on Tuesday read: "Caster remains steadfast in her defiance of the highly controversial IAAF regulations that require female athletes with naturally elevated testosterone levels to undergo hormonal drug intervention in order to compete in international competitions.

"Yesterday, a single judge of the Swiss Federal Supreme Court reversed prior rulings that had temporarily suspended the IAAF regulations pending the outcome of Caster's appeal against the CAS award.

"In this latest decision, the Supreme Court emphasised the strict requirements and high thresholds for the interim suspension of CAS awards and found that these were not fulfilled.

"This ruling will prevent Caster from defending her title at the World Championships in September 2019."

With the Tokyo 2020 Olympics under a year away, Semenya will continue to appeal against the regulations.

"I am very disappointed to be kept from defending my hard-earned title, but this will not deter me from continuing my fight for the human rights of all of the female athletes concerned," Semenya said.

Just 12 months out from the 2020 Olympic Games, sport fans can look forward to seeing the world's top established athletes in action in Tokyo.

But stars will also be born when eyes are trained on Japan this time next year.

And a number of young prospects who will still be teenagers when the Olympics rolls around can already have their sights set on making a mark.

We look at five such talents to watch in Tokyo.

 

ARIARNE TITMUS

Titmus will only be 19 when the Games get under way, but she made waves at this year's World Aquatics Championships, beating the great Katie Ledecky in the 400 metre freestyle in Gwangju.

The Australian holds the short-course world record for the 400m freestyle and won four medals, three of them gold, at last year's Commonwealth Games.

With such pedigree at such a young age, Titmus should be firmly in contention for multiple medals in the pool.

SHAN LIN

China could have another diving superstar in their midst in the form of Lin, who starred at the 2018 Youth Olympic Games with victories in the 10m platform and 3m springboard.

She won world championship gold in the mixed team event in Gwangju this year and if she continues in this vein then plenty more medals will be coming the 17-year-old's way in Tokyo.

 

TOMOKAZU HARIMOTO

The hopes of the home nation in table tennis may rest on the young shoulders of Harimoto.

That should not daunt the 16-year-old, however, with Harimoto having already established himself as one of the world's best.

Ranked fourth in the world, Harimoto won gold at the ITTF World Tour Grand Finals last year and may take some stopping in his pursuit of Olympic glory with the home crowd behind him.

 

TAKEFUSA KUBO

Another who will be able to rely on the support of the home fans is Real Madrid's Japan international footballer Kubo.

The winger was previously on Barcelona's books, predictably encouraging comparisons to Lionel Messi, but he joined their great rivals Madrid from FC Tokyo in June.

Although he is likely to play for their second string, Kubo starred for Japan at the Copa America and then featured for Madrid's first team in the International Champions Cup.

With the Samurai Blue preparing a serious assault on the Olympics, Kubo - 19 this time next year - is set to be a key figure.

JAGGER EATON

Skateboarding will make its Olympic bow next year, and America's Eaton will have his sights set on making history with a medal in Tokyo.

The youngest ever X Games competitor having made his debut at 11, Eaton won silver in the street event in Minneapolis and Oslo in 2018 and is a genuine contender to go one better in Japan and become one of the first Olympic skateboarding champions.

With just a year to go until the Olympics gets under way in Tokyo, athletes from all over the world already have gold medals in their sights.

Many are well on course to mount a strong challenge for glory, while others may consider themselves a long way from where they need to be.

With 12 months to go until the opening ceremony, excitement is building and over 3.2 million tickets have been sold.

We take a form check on five of the stars who could prove the big draws in Japan.

 

SIMONE BILES

Superstar Biles will retire from gymnastics after attempting to add to her medal tally in Tokyo.

Fitness permitting, it would be a surprise if the 22-year-old does not increase her haul of four Olympic golds and one bronze medal.

The American declared she will quit as "I feel like my body is kind of falling apart".

Biles put on another masterclass to win the women’s all-around title at the GK U.S. Classic last Saturday and eyebrows will be raised if she does not achieve more podium-topping success in her swan-song Games.

ADAM PEATY

Exceptional British swimmer Peaty continues to hit new heights, shattering world records and winning gold medals galore.

It was mission accomplished in the 24-year-old's quest to achieve 'Project 56' at the World Championships in Gwangju this month when he became the first person to dip under the 57-second barrier for the 100 metres breaststroke.

That record swim of 56.88secs ticked off one of Peaty's biggest goals and he has by no means finished yet.

The Englishman has raised his total of World Championships titles to six and the Olympic 100m breaststroke champion will be expected to be on the top step of the podium at least once in Tokyo.

 

CASTER SEMENYA

The Olympics might not be at the forefront of all-conquering South African athlete Semenya's mind at the moment.

Semenya has endured a complicated, drawn-out saga in a case involving world governing body the IAAF which has raised worries for her career.

The double Olympic 800 metres champion is awaiting a Federal Supreme Court of Switzerland verdict over whether she can continue to run against women over two laps of the track.

Semenya has long been challenging the IAAF's decision to impose restrictions on testosterone levels in women competing at distances ranging from 400m to one mile. The Swiss court has suspended that restriction for now.

Semenya's testosterone count is high but naturally occurring. It could see her sidelined if she refuses to take medication to reduce her level, unless the courts come down on her side.

The 28-year-old has not let the ongoing case affect her performances, setting the fastest 800m time by a woman on American soil of one minute and 55.70 seconds at the Diamond League meeting in Stanford last month.

 

CHRISTIAN COLEMAN

What is certain at the Games next year is that the men's 100m athletics gold is up for grabs, in the absence of Usain Bolt.

Bolt retired after the World Championships in London two years ago with eight Olympic gold medals to his name.

It is not the Jamaican legend's old rival Justin Gatlin - Olympic champion in 2004 - who is rated as the favourite to take Bolt's crown next year.

World champion Gatlin's fellow American Christian Coleman appears to be the man to beat, leading the way in the Diamond League and establishing himself as the top-ranked male sprinter on the planet.

 

RORY MCILROY

McIlroy was criticised for stating he would not watch the return of golf to the Olympic calendar three years ago in Rio, after opting out of the competition.

The four-time major champion cited the Zika virus as his reason for not teeing off in Brazil, where Justin Rose won the first Olympic golf event for 112 years.

However, Northern Irishman McIlroy stated he could not pass up the opportunity to be an Olympian next time around.

The former world number one will be hoping it is a case of 'what a difference a year makes' in terms of his summer form, having failed to make the cut at The Open in his homeland at Royal Portrush last week.

Rory McIlroy admits the fear of regret fuelled his change of heart over competing at the Olympics.

The Northern Irishman is on home soil for this week's 148th Open Championship, having caused a stir with comments he made at the same major three years ago.

At Royal Troon, ahead of the 2016 Olympics in Rio, McIlroy suggested he would not even bother to watch the golf competition, which ended up being won by Ryder Cup team-mate Justin Rose.

Despite his dismissive tone then, McIlroy - who initially cited the Zika virus as the reason for his absence from Brazil - had clearly shifted his stance when he addressed the issue at Royal Portrush on Wednesday as he now has Tokyo 2020 firmly in his sights.

"I think personally I needed to do a lot of inner thought and ask, 'Is this important to me? Why do I want to play it? Who do I want to represent?' All that sort of stuff," he said, with his decision apparently complicated by whether he would turn out for Ireland or Great Britain.

"At the start whenever I was thinking of playing the Olympics, I think I let other people's opinions of me weigh on that decision. And at the end of the day, it's my decision. I can't please everyone. 

"The only people that really care about who I play for, who I represent, don't mean anything to me. I don't care about them.

"So at the end of the day, I think with where golf is, with it being part of the Olympic movement, I think if I had to look back on my career and not played in one, I probably would have regretted it. 

"So that was part of the reason I wanted to go, for the experience, as well. It's going to be - it's a wonderful experience. I've never done anything like that before.

"And it's in Japan. I enjoy Japan. I enjoy the people. I enjoy the food. So it will be a nice week."

The 30-year-old is going in search of a second Claret Jug and fifth major, having not won one of golf's four landmark events since 2014.

The United States and China won the respective men and women's titles at the FIBA 3x3 World Cup finals in Amsterdam.

With the sport set to make its Olympic debut at Tokyo 2020, USA's male team will head into the games as strong contenders for gold after overcoming Latvia 18-14 on Sunday to claim the trophy for the first time.

China's women followed suit, overcoming Hungary 19-13 to lift their first world title.

Poland beat top-seeds Serbia to earn bronze in the men's competition, while France got their hands on the consolation prize in the women's draw by beating Australia.

This feature takes a look at the legacy of legendary quarter-miler Michael Johnson.

Naparima College head coach Angus Eve is not a happy man and intends to take his grouches all the way to the Minister of Sport and Youth Affairs in the hope that he can still get approximately 24 Trinidad and Tobago footballers into the Tokyo 2020 Olympic qualifiers. 

This walk down memory lane chronicles the rise of Jamaican superstar Veronica Campbell-Brown.

Boxing should be at Tokyo 2020, the International Olympic Committee's (IOC) executive board has advised, but the body plans to have the International Boxing Association (AIBA) suspended.

The IOC ceased planning for boxing at the next Olympic Games last year as it launched an investigation into AIBA following concerns over finances, governance and sporting integrity.

But the board's recommendation following a meeting on Wednesday was that organiser AIBA should be suspended, with boxing remaining on the slate for Tokyo.

A report found there has been "a lack of satisfactory progress" from AIBA since an inquiry committee was set up in November.

The IOC's decision must now be approved at its session in Switzerland next month.

Its statement added: "The status of AIBA's full recognition will in principle be reviewed after Tokyo 2020."

IOC president Thomas Bach said: "Today's decision was taken in the interest of the athletes and the sport of boxing.

"We want to ensure that the athletes can live their dream and participate in the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 while drawing the necessary consequences for AIBA following the recommendations of the inquiry committee.

"At the same time, we offer a pathway back to lifting the suspension, but there needs to be further fundamental change."

Rory McIlroy has said he is likely to represent Ireland at the 2020 Olympic Games, while Tiger Woods is also keen to participate in Tokyo.

Golf returned to the Olympic programme, after a 112-year absence, in Rio in 2016, but McIlroy was one of several leading players who opted not to play due to concerns over the Zika virus.

Asked about the Tokyo Games in a news conference at this week's US PGA Championship, McIlroy said: "I don't know. More likely than not I will play. I think it would be a great experience.

"It's just one of those things where it's just in the middle of a really busy stretch. But yeah, right now in my mind I'll most likely play."

Prior to his withdrawal from the Rio Olympics, McIlroy announced he would represent Ireland rather than Great Britain.

On Tuesday, he added: "I think as a young boy it was always my dream to play for Ireland. I wanted to play for Ireland. I was very proud to put on that shirt or that blazer.

"It's the same as like the rugby players, right? There's players that play for Ulster, but they want to play for Ireland. It's seen as a whole island sport, just like hockey is, just like most of the sports are.

"I had an unbelievable amateur career, and I don't mean that in terms of results, but I mean that in the experiences I had and the trips that I had and the friendships that I made and the friendships that I still have to this day. That was all because of playing for Ireland and getting close to some of those guys.

"I'm excited to be going to the Olympics. I'm excited to play for Ireland. It's going to be a great experience, and probably a little bit nostalgic because it'll bring me back to 15 years ago, whenever I was doing that with the same people. So it's going to be cool."

In an earlier news conference, resurgent Masters champion Woods said: "Would I like to play in the Olympics? Yes. I've never played in the Olympics, and I'm sure that I won't have many more opportunities going forward at 43 years old now to play in many Olympics.

"Yes, that would be a first for me and something that I would certainly welcome if I was part of the team.

"Getting there and making the team is going to be the tough part. How many events do I play, do I add a couple more to get in? These are all questions that will be answered going forward. I just know that if I play well in the big events like I did this year, things will take care of itself."

Pita Taufatofua hopes to create a splash at a third straight Olympic Games after revealing his plan to compete in kayaking at Tokyo 2020.

The Tongan shot to fame in 2016 when, as his country's flagbearer, he entered the stadium in Rio in traditional dress, including covering his bare torso in coconut oil.

Taekwondo was Taufatofua's sport in Rio, though he was back on a global stage two years later in PyeongChang when he switched seasons, becoming Tonga's first skier at a Winter Olympics.

Now the 35-year-old has set his target on competing at the next Olympics too - only this time in the water.

"I want to be a sprint kayaker," he told BBC Sport.

"It's a sport that's close to my heart as it's what my ancestors did for thousands of years when they colonised the Polynesian islands."

However, a major issue for Taufatofua is a lack of equipment. He used crowd-funding campaigns for previous Olympics but hopes to find "a partner or two" this time who can help finance his grand plan for next year.

"I'm currently training with a recreational kayak which is a completely different size and weight to the professional ones you'll see at the Olympics," he revealed.

"A new kayak could be anything up to $10,000, but I'm also looking for a partner or two that wants to be part of this journey and believes in what we're doing."

The president of Japan's Olympic Committee is to step down amid allegations of corruption in relation to the awarding of the 2020 Olympic Games.

On Tuesday, Tsunekazu Takeda announced he will vacate the role at the end of his term in June.

Takeda is being investigated by French judicial authorities over the bidding process for the Games in Tokyo next year.

President of the 2020 bid committee, Takeda denies any wrongdoing and says he will see out his tenure.

"I don't believe I've done anything illegal," Takeda said.

"It pains me to have created such a fuss, but I believe it is my responsibility to serve out the rest of my term."

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) backed Takeda after he confirmed he will not seek re-election.

"The IOC takes note with the greatest respect of the decision taken by Mr Takeda to resign as an IOC Member," the IOC said in a statement when contacted by Omnisport.

"Our respect of this decision is even higher, because he took this step to protect the Olympic Movement while the presumption of innocence, on which the IOC insists, continues to prevail."

 

Page 1 of 2
© 2018 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.