This walk down memory lane chronicles the rise of Jamaican superstar Veronica Campbell-Brown.

Boxing should be at Tokyo 2020, the International Olympic Committee's (IOC) executive board has advised, but the body plans to have the International Boxing Association (AIBA) suspended.

The IOC ceased planning for boxing at the next Olympic Games last year as it launched an investigation into AIBA following concerns over finances, governance and sporting integrity.

But the board's recommendation following a meeting on Wednesday was that organiser AIBA should be suspended, with boxing remaining on the slate for Tokyo.

A report found there has been "a lack of satisfactory progress" from AIBA since an inquiry committee was set up in November.

The IOC's decision must now be approved at its session in Switzerland next month.

Its statement added: "The status of AIBA's full recognition will in principle be reviewed after Tokyo 2020."

IOC president Thomas Bach said: "Today's decision was taken in the interest of the athletes and the sport of boxing.

"We want to ensure that the athletes can live their dream and participate in the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 while drawing the necessary consequences for AIBA following the recommendations of the inquiry committee.

"At the same time, we offer a pathway back to lifting the suspension, but there needs to be further fundamental change."

Rory McIlroy has said he is likely to represent Ireland at the 2020 Olympic Games, while Tiger Woods is also keen to participate in Tokyo.

Golf returned to the Olympic programme, after a 112-year absence, in Rio in 2016, but McIlroy was one of several leading players who opted not to play due to concerns over the Zika virus.

Asked about the Tokyo Games in a news conference at this week's US PGA Championship, McIlroy said: "I don't know. More likely than not I will play. I think it would be a great experience.

"It's just one of those things where it's just in the middle of a really busy stretch. But yeah, right now in my mind I'll most likely play."

Prior to his withdrawal from the Rio Olympics, McIlroy announced he would represent Ireland rather than Great Britain.

On Tuesday, he added: "I think as a young boy it was always my dream to play for Ireland. I wanted to play for Ireland. I was very proud to put on that shirt or that blazer.

"It's the same as like the rugby players, right? There's players that play for Ulster, but they want to play for Ireland. It's seen as a whole island sport, just like hockey is, just like most of the sports are.

"I had an unbelievable amateur career, and I don't mean that in terms of results, but I mean that in the experiences I had and the trips that I had and the friendships that I made and the friendships that I still have to this day. That was all because of playing for Ireland and getting close to some of those guys.

"I'm excited to be going to the Olympics. I'm excited to play for Ireland. It's going to be a great experience, and probably a little bit nostalgic because it'll bring me back to 15 years ago, whenever I was doing that with the same people. So it's going to be cool."

In an earlier news conference, resurgent Masters champion Woods said: "Would I like to play in the Olympics? Yes. I've never played in the Olympics, and I'm sure that I won't have many more opportunities going forward at 43 years old now to play in many Olympics.

"Yes, that would be a first for me and something that I would certainly welcome if I was part of the team.

"Getting there and making the team is going to be the tough part. How many events do I play, do I add a couple more to get in? These are all questions that will be answered going forward. I just know that if I play well in the big events like I did this year, things will take care of itself."

Pita Taufatofua hopes to create a splash at a third straight Olympic Games after revealing his plan to compete in kayaking at Tokyo 2020.

The Tongan shot to fame in 2016 when, as his country's flagbearer, he entered the stadium in Rio in traditional dress, including covering his bare torso in coconut oil.

Taekwondo was Taufatofua's sport in Rio, though he was back on a global stage two years later in PyeongChang when he switched seasons, becoming Tonga's first skier at a Winter Olympics.

Now the 35-year-old has set his target on competing at the next Olympics too - only this time in the water.

"I want to be a sprint kayaker," he told BBC Sport.

"It's a sport that's close to my heart as it's what my ancestors did for thousands of years when they colonised the Polynesian islands."

However, a major issue for Taufatofua is a lack of equipment. He used crowd-funding campaigns for previous Olympics but hopes to find "a partner or two" this time who can help finance his grand plan for next year.

"I'm currently training with a recreational kayak which is a completely different size and weight to the professional ones you'll see at the Olympics," he revealed.

"A new kayak could be anything up to $10,000, but I'm also looking for a partner or two that wants to be part of this journey and believes in what we're doing."

The president of Japan's Olympic Committee is to step down amid allegations of corruption in relation to the awarding of the 2020 Olympic Games.

On Tuesday, Tsunekazu Takeda announced he will vacate the role at the end of his term in June.

Takeda is being investigated by French judicial authorities over the bidding process for the Games in Tokyo next year.

President of the 2020 bid committee, Takeda denies any wrongdoing and says he will see out his tenure.

"I don't believe I've done anything illegal," Takeda said.

"It pains me to have created such a fuss, but I believe it is my responsibility to serve out the rest of my term."

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) backed Takeda after he confirmed he will not seek re-election.

"The IOC takes note with the greatest respect of the decision taken by Mr Takeda to resign as an IOC Member," the IOC said in a statement when contacted by Omnisport.

"Our respect of this decision is even higher, because he took this step to protect the Olympic Movement while the presumption of innocence, on which the IOC insists, continues to prevail."

 

SportsMax will provide wire to wire coverage of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.  Today officially marks 500 games to the big event. 

To kick things off we take a look at the historic exploits of the Jamaica duo of Authur Wint and Herb McKenley along with T&T javelin thrower Keshorn Walcott.

Members of the SportsMax Team link up at the home of champions for a weekly, lively discussion surrounding the latest happenings in the world of sports.  This week's topics included the upcoming Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, the Caribbean stars expected to shine and our favourite Olympic moments.  Join us for SportsMax MidWeek Live, streaming live on Facebook, this and every week. 

Tick tock, tick tock. The Tokyo Olympic clock has hit 500 days to go.

Organizers marked the milestone on Tuesday, unveiling the stylized pictogram figures for next year's Tokyo Olympics. The pictogram system was first used extensively in 1964 when the Japanese capital lasted hosted the Summer Olympics — just 19 years after the end of World War II.

A picture system to illustrate sports events was used in the 1936 Berlin Olympics, and 12 years later in London. Other Olympics sporadically used some drawings for the same purpose.

But the '64 Olympics originated the standardized symbols that have become familiar in every Olympics since then.

Japanese athletes posed with the pictograms and their designer, Masaaki Hiromura. Organizers also toured regions that will host Olympic events, including the area north of Tokyo that was devastated by a 2011 earthquake, tsunami, and resulting damage to nearby nuclear reactors.

"They are simple but yet dynamic," Hiromura said, explaining his designs to several hundred people. "These are pictograms that look like they are about to start moving."

Hiromura designed 50 pictograms for 33 sports. Some sports will use more than one pictogram when the Olympic open on July 24, 2020.

The '64 Tokyo Olympics came up with the pictograms, partly because the games were the first in Asia and held in a country where the language was inaccessible to many international visitors.

Unlike other recent Olympics, construction projects are largely on schedule. The new National Stadium, the centrepiece of the games, is to be completed by the by the end of the year at a cost estimated at $1.25 billion.

That's not to say these Olympics are problem free.

Costs continue to rise, although local organizers and the IOC say they are cutting costs — or at least slowing the rise.

As an example, last month organizers said the cost of the opening and closing ceremonies had risen by 40 percent compared with the forecast in 2013 when Tokyo was awarded the games.

The Olympic Channel and SportsMax today announced a new partnership featuring both linear and digital programming across 22 Caribbean territories in support of their objective to engage new audiences and younger generations with the Olympic Movement all year round. 

All medals at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games will be made from recycled waste after organisers revealed they were on track to reach their target of collecting enough metals.

In April 2017, the organising committee launched an initiative to recoup unwanted electronic devices with companies across Japan, as well as athletes and the general public, lending their support to the drive.

The scheme planned to collect 30.3 kilograms of gold, 4,100kg of silver and 2,700kg of bronze in order to produce the medals, and on Friday it was confirmed that those targets were expected to be achieved by the end of March.

The release from organisers confirmed that over five million mobile phones had been handed in, contributing to almost 50,000 tons of devices.

As of the end of October 2018, 93.7 per cent of the gold and 85.4 per cent of the silver required had been collected, while the full amount of bronze had been sourced as early as June of that year.

The designs for the medals for both Games are due to be revealed later in 2019.

The president of Japan's Olympic Committee has denied reports that he has been indicted after French judicial authorities launched an investigation into allegations of corruption in relation to the awarding of the 2020 Tokyo Games.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has ceased planning for boxing at the 2020 Games after launching an investigation into the International Boxing Association (AIBA).

A statement from the IOC said the probe was a result of AIBA's latest progress report in regards to concerns over finances, governance and sporting integrity.

AIBA had previously been warned that a failure to resolve its in-house problems could lead to boxing missing out on Tokyo 2020.

The IOC's Executive Board said in a statement that it "acknowledged AIBA's progress and its commitments highlighted in its progress report, but several points of significant concern remain".

As a result, one of the additional measures taken by the IOC is to "freeze the planning for the Olympic boxing tournament at Tokyo 2020, including official contact between AIBA and the Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee, ticket sales, approval and

implementation of a qualification system, test event planning and finalisation of the competition schedule".

The election of Uzbek businessman Gafur Rakhimov as head of AIBA was also noted as area of concern.

Rakhimov was elected president despite the United States Treasury Department putting him on a sanctions list over alleged links to organised crime, claims he denies.

On Thursday, AIBA said it had "managed to restore a healthy and sustainable financial situation".

 

Wladimir Klitschko has outlined his concerns about the uncertain future of boxing at the Olympic Games.

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