JOA, JABBFA partner to host virtual workouts

By Sports Desk October 09, 2020

The Jamaica Olympic Association (JOA) has partnered with its member association, the Jamaica Amateur Bodybuilding and Fitness Association (JABBFA) to host virtual workout sessions under the name and style "We Train” commencing on October 19, 2020.

In delivering the keynote address at the launch at Olympic Manor on October 8, President of the JOA, Christopher Samuda, said that "long before the advent of the Coronavirus pandemic the JOA had gone virtual and digital in advocating that the business of sport is no longer a manual stroll in the park but has become 'highway' technology in its training methods and system and a science in engineering optimal performance of the athlete."

The workout sessions will feature national athletes going through technical paces under the supervision of experienced JABBFA instructors, who will demonstrate simple methods that can be done at home in the pursuit of and maintaining fitness.

President Samuda in lauding the partnership remarked that "the series 'We Train' will bring to Facebook, Instagram and their internet relatives, Olympism in action and in motion with each live session bringing alive the values of inspiration, courage, determination and respect for which the JOA and the Olympic movement are known" In a dynamic environment and amidst the pandemic where sport is battling to remain bankable and sustainable, President Samuda stated the imperative for change and transformation in sport.

"Sport has become a business of cost efficiency and revenue generation for the administrator, capital intensive for infrastructure development and ‘bang for the buck' investment for the sponsor and financier" he said.

President Samuda's exhortation to the virtual audience at the launch and stakeholders was direct: "We all had better get fit and with the programme if we are to get in the game, to stay in the game, to change the game and, ultimately, to transform the game".

The objectives and value of the partnership between the JOA and JABBFA will certainly go beyond the physical as President Samuda reminded: "An athlete, a bodybuilder, appreciates that a contoured body is but physical fitness and well-being; but an inspired athlete and bodybuilder understands, beyond the muscle of life and living, that character and transformation comes from within which are then reflected outwardly."

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