Breakdancing set to join surfing, skateboarding and sport climbing at 2024 Olympics

By Sports Desk June 25, 2019

Breakdancing is set to debut at the 2024 Paris Olympics after its inclusion - along with surfing, skateboarding and sport climbing - was approved by International Olympic Committee (IOC) members.

All four sports were proposed by Paris organisers in February, while breakdancing and sport climbing both appeared as medal events at the Youth Olympic Games in Buenos Aires last year.

Skateboarding, climbing and surfing will make their Olympic debuts at Tokyo 2020.

"The four sports that Paris has proposed are all totally in line with Olympic Agenda 2020 because they contribute to making the programme more gender balanced and urban, and offer the opportunity to connect with the younger generation," said IOC president Thomas Bach.

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    Learmonth and Taylor-Brown came away from the rest of the field and finished a race, which was shortened due to the heat, hand-in-hand with broad smiles on their faces on Thursday.

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  • Semenya to miss World Athletics Championships after Swiss court ruling Semenya to miss World Athletics Championships after Swiss court ruling

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