Christopher Taylor shocked by Belgium national U20 record run

By July 13, 2018
Belgium's Jonathan Sacoor raises his arms to the heavens after upsetting Jamaica's Christopher Taylor (left) and Chantz Sawyers at the IAAF World Under 20 Championship in Tampere, Finland on Friday. Belgium's Jonathan Sacoor raises his arms to the heavens after upsetting Jamaica's Christopher Taylor (left) and Chantz Sawyers at the IAAF World Under 20 Championship in Tampere, Finland on Friday.

Jamaica’s Christopher Taylor was expected to claim gold at the IAAF World Under 20 Championships in Tampere, Finland but nobody told Belgium’s Jonathan Sacoor. 

The 18-year-old, just as he had done in the semi-final, tracked the leader, before storming away from him in the final metres of the one-lap event to win in a new Belgium national under 20 record, 45.03 seconds.

Taylor, the man who finished second to lead Jamaica’s second and third place podium finishes, had stormed through the first 250 metres and looked a sure winner until he winced at the top of the 300-metre mark.

At that point, the question of whether or not he had gone too quickly and not left enough in the tank became a real possibility.

But Taylor had a 10-metre lead and maybe that would have been enough, as the favourite continued to lead up to 380 metres, but only just.

At that point, Sacoor looked the stronger athlete and he separated himself from Taylor, who could not respond given his earlier exertions.

Taylor faded to end in 45.38 seconds, while his teammate, Chantz Sawyers was third in 45.89.

The field was rounded out by Italy’s Edoardo Scotti (46.20), the United States Howard Fields, (46.53), Canada’s Khamal Stewart-Baynes (46.79), his teammate Myles Misener-Daley (47.03), and Barbados’ Jonathan Jones, 48.01.

Paul-Andre Walker

Paul-Andre is the Managing Editor at SportsMax.tv. He comes to the role with almost 20 years of experience as journalist. That experience includes all facets of media. He began as a sports Journalist in 2001, quickly moving into radio, where he was an editor before becoming a news editor and then an entertainment editor with one of the biggest media houses in the Caribbean.

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