Jerome Taylor will replace Pakistan’s Amad Butt in the Jamaica Tallawahs squad for the start of the 2019 Hero Caribbean Premier League (CPL) season.

 

Several members of Jamaica’s Reggae Girlz history-making World Cup squad including Bunny Shaw, Havana Solaun, Toriana Patterson, Allyson Swaby and Lauren Silver, have declared that they will not play another match for Jamaica until they are paid money they are owed from their world cup campaign.

Each has posted a No Pay No Play poster on their Instagram pages stating their position.

Under a banner declaring No Pay, No Play, the girls posted:

“This is an issue that goes simply beyond “getting paid.” It’s about the girls following in our footsteps. It’s about leaving something better off than when you found it. We signed contracts and have yet to be paid.

“The Reggae Girlz are the first Caribbean team ever to qualify for a World Cup. The hours of hard work and dedication put in by this team doesn’t have a monetary value. It’s about so much more than money. Women’s soccer has taken a back seat for too long. It’s time to take a stand.

“For this reason, I, along with my teammates won't be participating in any tournaments until being paid,” the post said.

In response, Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) President Michael Ricketts said he does not know what would have triggered this latest protest from the Reggae Girls. The players are owed US$120,000, Ricketts said, and half that amount was transferred through Sagicor Bank last week.

In the meantime, team manager Jean Nelson had been in communication with the players informing them that some money had been transferred to their accounts ad that the balance would be paid once they received US$750,000 earned at the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup the end of September.

FIFA, Ricketts said, is to pay over that sum at the end of the month.

However, the players insist they have not been paid.

“My teammates and I have not received any money. Our agreement ended on August 30 and today is September 2 and there is nothing pending,” Lauren Silver confirmed, indicating that the players had formed their own union in anticipation of something like this happening.

“We as a group just always wanted to have a line of communication open with each other. Like most companies have a union but since it was a repetitive action, we as a team have been trying to work together more.”

She did acknowledge that Jean Nelson did communicate with them but the bottom line is that they still have not been paid.

“Jean has communicated with us to the best of her ability but at the end of the day she is not responsible for our salary,” she said.

 

 

Virat Kohli insisted his whole team deserved credit after a second pummelling of West Indies ensured he became India's most successful Test captain.

Kohli's 28th win as skipper, which took him past the previous record tally of MS Dhoni, was just like the 27th, an emphatic thrashing of an overmatched Windies outfit.

India completed a 257-run victory on the fourth day of the second Test in Kingston.

Asked about his success as captain in the post-match presentation, Kohli said: "It's a by-product of the quality team that we have here, to be honest. I think all the credit has to go to the whole team.

"Captaincy is just a 'c' in front of your name, honestly. It's the collective effort that matters.

"It took a lot of character from the boys. It was a game full of grit and determination and [we're] really happy to get the result."

India - the world's number-one ranked side - now sit top of the World Test Championship table, their 2-0 series win in the Caribbean earning a maximum 120-point haul.

"For us it's just the start of the championship," said Kohli.

"What's happened in the past is irrelevant and we just want to look forward and keep continuing to play good cricket."

India's star batsman also lavished praise on Hanuma Vihari, who scored his maiden Test century in the first innings as India piled up 416.

"I think it was a top-class innings," said Kohli. "He's a guy who's very sure of his game and it shows when he plays.

"It's a very young career [so far] but he's shown why he has been backed and selected in this team."

No Windies player came close to matching Vihari's feats. Shamarh Brooks' second-innings fifty was the only score of note for a team bowled out for 117 and 210.

The Windies fared similarly in the first Test, making 222 and 100, leading skipper Jason Holder to state: "We just need to be able to put some scores on the board. We haven't been able to get the answers as yet."

India skipper, Virat Kohli, believes his charges completed a successful routing of the West Indies in the Caribbean by being tough when they needed to be. 

Kohli was speaking after his touring side completed a 257-run victory over a virtually hapless West Indies in Jamaica.

Sent into bat, India scored 416 against the bowling of Jason Holder, 5-77 and debutant Rahkeem Cornwall, 3-105. India pressed the advantage when they bowled, skittling out the West Indies for a paltry 117 thanks, in large part to Jasprit Bumrah’s 6-27. Batting again India took a commanding lead after scoring 168-4 before again bowling out the West Indies, this time for 210.

"Pretty comprehensive again. We played good cricket, and getting the result in the manner you want is crucial as a team,” said Kohli after the game.

But it wasn’t always easy, despite the margin of victory and Kohli thanked his team for toughing out those moments when it wasn’t.

“We were put under pressure in a couple of sessions. While batting, there were some tricky situations but it took some character from the boys. Hanuma [Vihari] was the standout batsman, but Ajinkya [Rahane] in the second innings, Mayank [Argarwal] in the first innings, Ishant [Sharma] with the fifty - it was an innings full of grit,” said Kohli.

Vihari scored his maiden Test century in the first innings before going on to score an unbeaten half-century in the second to claim the man-of-the-match trophy.

“According to the surface, Vihari's innings was top class. He looks confident and the dressing-room feels calm when he bats. He's always willing to improve and correcting his mistakes. Plays with a lot of heart. Up to do anything for the team. That's why he invariably plays crucial innings for us. Young career for him so far, but he showed why he's been backed by this team,” said Kohli.

The man of the match was elated with his performance as well.

"Maiden Test hundred feels great. Missed out on the hundred in the last match, so was focusing on a big score this time. We were 200 for 5 in the first innings, and that was my goal while batting with Rishabh Pant. You had to be patient on this wicket, and select the ball where you'll score runs. There was something for the bowlers, so you need to wait for the balls. Took some calculated risks against the spinners. Even in the second innings, the template worked well for me,” said Vihari.

The Trinbago Knight Riders have appointed Kieron Pollard captain for the 2019 Hero CPL season. They came to the decision after Dwayne Bravo injured his finger during practice and could miss a significant part of the season.

India wrapped up another thumping win over West Indies on Monday, triumphing by 257 runs in Kingston to secure a 2-0 series victory.

The Windies were beaten by 318 runs in the first Test and their hopes of avoiding another heavy defeat appeared slim at best when they began day four on 45-2 having been set a notional target of 468.

Shamarh Brooks (50) and Jermaine Blackwood (38) delayed the inevitable, the latter featuring as a concussion substitute after Darren Bravo retired hurt having been struck on the helmet by Jasprit Bumrah in the final over of day three.

However, the Windies then slumped from 159-4 to 210 all out in the afternoon session, skipper Jason Holder the last man to fall for 39.

India - the world's number-one ranked side - therefore claim a maximum 120-point haul from their first series in the World Test Championship.

Brooks, who resumed with four to his name, could at least take consolation from a maiden international fifty.

After registering a golden duck in the first innings, he faced 119 balls at the second time of asking, striking nine fours including a glorious whip through square leg off Bumrah that brought up his half-century.

Only two wickets fell in the morning session, although Bravo walked off having made 23, with Blackwood subsequently named as his replacement.

The late call-up rode his luck to put on 61 with Brooks after Roston Chase and Shimron Hetmyer had fallen in quick succession.

Blackwood was dropped three times, while there was also a let-off for Brooks on 30 when he was caught at first slip off Ravindra Jadeja only for a no-ball to be called with the bowler having overstepped.

It mattered little in the end as the Windies subsided after lunch, Brooks run out by a brilliant direct hit from Virat Kohli amid the collapse.

Mohammed Shami and Jadeja finished with three wickets apiece, the latter rounding things off as Holder was bowled aiming a desperate heave across the line.

When the first week of Concacaf Nations League Qualifying was completed, one of the most eye-catching results was Saint Lucia’s 3-0 triumph at Antigua and Barbuda. 

Using their speed and quickness, Saint Lucia broke out for three goals in the second half against the Benna Boyz to pocket the victory, setting the tone for a solid CNLQ campaign that ended with a 2W-1D-1L record. 

Leading the way for Saint Lucia was Jevick Mcfarlane, who scored in that win at Antigua and Barbuda before bagging a brace in the week four 3-2 victory over Aruba. 

Yet it was in defeat that best showed Saint Lucia’s emergence on the Concacaf scene, when they gave eventual 2019 Concacaf Gold Cup semifinalists Haiti everything that could handle in a narrow 2-1 defeat. 

But it is not just Macfarlane who strikes fear into the hearts of opposing defenses. Flying winger Pernel Williams will cause plenty of headaches, which is bad news for League B, Group B opponents El Salvador, Montserrat and the Dominican Republic. 

Saint Lucia’s Nations League journey begins with the toughest contest of them all: a trip to the always-difficult Estadio Cuscatlan in San Salvador to take on El Salvador. 

Yet after stunning Antigua and Barbuda in week one of the CNLQ, Saint Lucia will have the belief that they can pull off another eye-catching victory and rise that to a first-place finish in the group.

Mason Toye scored twice as Minnesota United shocked league-leading Los Angeles FC 2-0, while Zlatan Ibrahimovic was unable to prevent LA Galaxy from losing late at Seattle Sounders.

Toye's first-half brace saw Western Conference and Supporters' Shield leaders LAFC surprisingly beaten at home for the first time this MLS season on Sunday.

LAFC had gone 13 league matches unbeaten at Banc of California Stadium in 2019 but that streak came to an end in the absence of star Carlos Vela, who missed the match after suffering a hamstring injury against the Galaxy last time out.

Toye stole the show for visiting Minnesota, who silenced the Los Angeles crowd in the 25th minute when the forward found the back of the net from an acute angle.

He doubled the lead just four minutes later after producing a stunning long-range strike to beat LAFC goalkeeper Pablo Sisniega.

Minnesota moved up to third in the Western Conference, 17 points adrift of high-flying LAFC after 28 matches, and a point behind second-placed Seattle.

The Sounders consolidated their place in the standings thanks to Sunday's thrilling 4-3 victory at home to Ibrahimovic's Galaxy.

Trailing 2-0 after 55 minutes, Ibrahimovic's goal in the 66th minute triggered a comeback as the Galaxy equalised through Uriel Antuna with 15 minutes remaining.

Seattle quickly restored their lead via Jordan Morris two minutes later, only for Jorgen Skjelvik to make it 3-3 in the 81st minute.

But the Sounders had the final say in a wild showdown as Cristian Roldan – who gave Seattle a 2-0 lead – netted his second of the match at the death.

Jamaica triple jumper Shanieka Ricketts contends she is encouraged by the consistency of recent performances, after claiming the women’s title at the ISTAF Berlin World Challenge Meeting, in Germany on Sunday.

Fresh off claiming the Diamond League title with a leap just under 15m, Ricketts cleared 14.63m to take top spot in the women’s triple jump in Berlin.  Patricia Mamona of Portugal claimed second place with a leap of 14.18 and Dovile Kilty of Lithuania placed third with a leap of 14.15.   Kimberly Williams, the other Jamaican in the event, finished 5th with a leap of 13.96m.

“I feel great. My best jump was 14.63m, that shows that I have a lot of consistency,” Ricketts said.

“This was my final rehearsal for Doha. Achieving such a result after the DL final a few days ago is great, incredible. I was hoping to jump further, but we had a negative breeze (wind), and I was tired from the DL final. I really like it here, the crowd was electric and gave us a lot of support,” she added.

In another result, Danniel Thomas-Dodd threw 18.02m for 4th in the women’s shot put. Canadian Brittany Crew won the event with 19.28m.

Jamaica Olympic and world 110m hurdles champion Omar McLeod expressed delight with his conditioning as the clock counts down to the IAAF World Championships, in Doha later this month.

The sprint hurdler clocked a comfortable looking 13.07, well clear of France’s Pascal Martinot-Lagarde, who was second in 13.25, to claim top spot at the ISTAF Berlin World Challenge Meeting in Germany on Sunday.  Barbados’ Shane Brathwaite was third in 13.36.

McLeod will have plenty of reason to feel encouraged following a tough start to the season, which was perhaps fueled by somewhat of a ride on a coaching carousel of sorts early on.  The 25-year-old had trained with Eldrick Floreal up until late 2018 but then moved to Gary Evans at Empire Athletics in Florida.  Tony Ross at World Fastest Humans was his hurdles coach. 

Following early struggles, however, the athlete joined Tumbleweed camp of elite coach Rana Reider in Jacksonville.  His performances seem to have since improved as he claimed the top spot in Birmingham two weeks ago, before winning again in Germany.

“Everything was coming together perfectly. I ran so smooth, tight over the hurdles. This was like a final rehearsal for Doha,” McLeod said.

“I did it! Like my coach told me, I just got out and took control. Everything was good – the start, the finish and every hurdle. You could say it was a perfect race,” he added.

Fellow Jamaicans Orlando Bennett, 13.54 and Ronald Levy, 14.24 were 8th and 9th respectively.

 

Another emphatic India victory over West Indies continues to look inevitable in Kingston after the overmatched hosts ended day three on 45-2 in their second innings, having been set 468 for victory.

Jasprit Bumrah's six-wicket burst on the previous evening put India - winners of the series-opener by 318 runs - in total command of the second Test and ensured the Windies began Sunday's play trailing by 329 on 87-7.

They were dismissed for 117 before lunch, despite contrasting shows of modest resistance from Jahmar Hamilton and Kemar Roach, before India opted against enforcing the follow-on and declared on 168-4 to leave a mammoth target.

Roach removed touring skipper Virat Kohli for a golden duck and came agonisingly close to emulating Bumrah's hat-trick from the previous day, only missing out on a third wicket in as many balls when Ajinkya Rahane inside-edged a delivery past his stumps for four.

Kohli's exit left India 36-3, but Rahane (64 not out) and first-innings centurion Hanuma Vihari (53 not out) raised the tempo in a fifth-wicket stand of 111 that set up an evening declaration.

The Windies then lost both of their opening batsmen in the 13 overs before stumps and appear to be facing a hopeless task with two days still remaining.

Although India are in command, Roach could be proud of his efforts on Sunday.

He struck a trio of boundaries in an innings of 17 that, in tandem with Hamilton's 59-ball five, at least prolonged the Windies' miserable first innings.

Roach then starred with the ball when India batted again, trapping Mayank Agarwal lbw for four before striking twice in the 21st over.

KL Rahul's painful innings of six, which spanned 63 balls, ended when he was caught behind and Kohli immediately followed suit having been forced to play at a teasing delivery.

Roach then found Rahane's inside edge with his next delivery, but the ball narrowly missed the stumps and instead ran to the fence.

West Indies' only subsequent success came courtesy of skipper Jason Holder, who ousted Cheteshwar Pujara for 27 before Rahane and Vihari found fluency in the evening session.

Kohli called a halt to the innings after both batsmen passed 50 and soon had reason to celebrate as Kraigg Brathwaite edged Ishant Sharma through to Rishabh Pant in the third over of the Windies' second dig.

John Campbell was guilty of an inexcusably loose shot as he drove airily at Mohammed Shami to be caught by Kohli at third slip.

Darren Bravo made it through to stumps in the company of Shamarh Brooks, but the former suffered a nasty blow to the helmet from Bumrah in the final over of the day.

Former standout Jamaican high-school athlete Twayne Crooks died Sunday morning from stage-four stomach cancer, his mother Marie Chambers-Garvey has confirmed.

Two of the 12 coaches in Jamaica’s Red Stripe Premier League have already been fired.

Jerome Waite, longstanding coach with Arnett Gardens, was last week, sacked and this week, the coach of Dunbeholden, former Reggae Boy, Fabian Taylor was shown the door.

Waite, it was said, would not have enough time with Arnett Gardens because of his duties with the national programme. Waite is coach of Jamaica’s under-23 outfit.

Taylor’s case also had to do with the stresses involved in starting a new season at the top level in Jamaican football. The former Reggae Boy was, reportedly, not pleased with the nature of the squad Dunbeholden were going to start the season with.

Dunbeholden have returned to the tried and tested, Regel Smith, who got them to the Premier League.

Waite, who won four Premier League titles with the club,  has been replaced by Wolmer’s player and former Arnett Gardens centre half, Alex Thomas. Thomas is also the coach of Wolmer’s Boys’ in Jamaica’s schoolboy urban area competitions, the Manning and Walker cups.

Jasprit Bumrah claimed a hat-trick in a quite sensational display that set India on course for another big victory in the second Test against West Indies, who ended day two in disarray on 87-7.

The tourists, who won the first match by a whopping 318 runs, initially progressed from 264-5 to 416 all out on day two in Kingston, thanks largely to Hanuma Vihari's maiden Test hundred and 57 from Ishant Sharma.

If that ensured India maintained control of proceedings, what followed certainly left the Windies staring at defeat as Bumrah ran through their top order almost single-handedly.

He returned outstanding figures of 6-16 from 9.1 overs - including just the third Test hat-trick by an India bowler - in a phenomenal perfromance.

The Windies were 22-5 at one stage and grateful to Shimron Hetmyer (34) for a recovery of sorts as they at least batted out the evening session, ending the day 329 runs behind with only three first-innings wickets in hand.

Bumrah is playing just his 12th Test but already has 61 wickets and a quintet of five-wicket hauls after this remarkable spell.

The 25-year-old had put a dent in the Windies' response even before his hat-trick, tempting an edge from John Campbell (2) for the early breakthrough.

That came in Bumrah's third over - after which he had figures of 1-3 - and his fourth was staggering.

Darren Bravo was taken low at second slip by KL Rahul off the second ball, before Sharmarh Brooks fell lbw immediately, his review proving unsuccessful.

The finger did not go up for the next ball to Roston Chase, but Virat Kohli was confident the new batsman had also been trapped leg before and the review backed him up, confiming Bumrah's hat-trick.

Although Hetmyer belatedly stopped the Windies' rot, Bumrah was not done and Kraigg Brathwaite was caught behind in the 13th over, having had the audacity to hit the bowler for four from the previous delivery.

Bumrah briefly let someone else in on the act, with Hetmyer's brave resistance ended by Mohammed Shami, but the chief destroyer was back at it as home captain Jason Holder swiped to mid-off.

The show-stealing turn of Bumrah perhaps unfortunately pushed Vihari (111) and Ishant out of the headlines after the pair performed admirably with the bat.

Vihari built a series of partnerships - including an eighth-wicket stand of 112 with Sharma - before three wickets in as many overs finally brought India's first innings to an end.

Holder's dismissal of Vihari gave the all-rounder his fifth wicket of the innings and his 100th in Test cricket, also leaving number 11 Bumrah unbeaten on a day when he could do no wrong.

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