Former Cricket West Indies (CWI) president Dave Cameron has accused his detractors of wanting overnight success and promised to write a tell-all memoir about his time in office.

Following a three-term spell in charge of the regional governing body, Cameron was defeated by Ricky Skerritt earlier this year.  The Jamaican had served as head of the association since defeating Julian Hunte in 2013.

During his time in charge, Cameron has been credited with implementing improved retainer contracts for players and officials, restructuring the regional competitions and improved relations with the West Indies Player’s Association (WIPA).  The Windies team while struggling in the world rankings, also claimed two T20 world titles, and the women’s and youth titles.

“We tried to implement certain things within West Indies cricket but I think, as a people, we want success but we don’t want to understand the road to get to success because it doesn’t happen overnight,” Cameron told the Good Morning Jojo Show.

“ We had a very successful home series earlier this year against England which I thought made a lot of people happy…but that’s not what we want; we want something else, and so I will keep those thoughts and I will commit them to writing at some point in time,” he added.

“I’ve been a part of organisations that have very high standards and I tried to implement that at West Indies cricket.  I tried to ensure West Indies cricket survived and I can say that I don’t believe anybody in management or leadership has the wrong views or different views from myself on West Indies cricket, but we just all have different ways of achieving those results.”

Chris Gayle made just four runs on his 299th ODI appearance for West Indies as the first match of their series with India was abandoned due to rain.

Having elected not to retire after the World Cup as initially planned, Gayle matched Brian Lara's one-day appearance record on Thursday, though he failed to impress with the bat and made just four runs from 31 deliveries.

After a delayed start, the Windies survived unscathed for five overs before the weather closed in once more, halting play.

When the action resumed, the home side looked in good shape as Evin Lewis clicked into gear, hitting two sixes and a pair of fours in the space of seven balls.

But while Lewis - who finished up unbeaten on 40 - was upping the scoring rate, Gayle could not get into his stride. He eventually succumbed to a full delivery from Kuldeep Yadav, edging onto his own stumps.

Shai Hope came in to replace Gayle, though the match would not last much longer, with the rain returning. Following several pitch inspections, the officials called off the game with West Indies having reached 54-1 in 13 overs.

Gayle will have the chance to atone for his disappointing display in the second match of the three-game series on Sunday.

Seven Jamaicans will be recognised for their outstanding contribution to the country’s sporting development when the 2019 national honours and awards are handed out during the annual ceremony at King’s House on National Heroes Day, Monday, October 21.

The seven are among 143 Jamaicans who will be honoured overall.

Five of the seven will be vested with the Order of Distinction in the Officer Class. They are First Vice-president of the Jamaica Olympic Association, Chris Stokes; President of MVP Track Club and well-respected track and field analyst, Bruce James; tennis enthusiast, Llockett McGregor; horse racing commentator Brian ‘Spuddy’ Rickman and Hugh Perry, who is being recognised for contributions to cricket and football.

Stokes, is the Chairman of the Jamaica Bobsleigh and Skeleton Federation.  He was a member of the Jamaican bobsled team that made history, in the process stunning the world, when they appeared at the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics.

The movie, ‘Cool Runnings’ was inspired by the exploits of the team.

James played an instrumental role in the creation of the world-famous MVP track club that is based at the University of Technology in Papine, St Andrew. He was firmly of the view that world-class athletes can be trained in Jamaica.

That vision has paid off as the club, under the guidance of the highly respected coach, Stephen Francis, has produced Olympic and World  Champions, as well as world record holders. These include Bridgette Foster-Hylton, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Elaine Thompson and Asafa Powell. The club has also produced numerous other medallists on the world stage.

Also being recognised for their contribution to sport are Christopher Dehring and Margaret Beckford who will receive the Order of Distinction Commander Class.

Dehring is being honoured for the part he played in the successful bid by the West Indies to host the 2007 Cricket World Cup in the Caribbean.

Beckford, the first president of Netball Jamaica, is being honoured for helping to develop the sport in Jamaica.

Windies One Day International (ODI) skipper Jason Holder has targeted batsmen going deep into the innings as crucial for success against in-form India when the three-match series bowls off on Thursday.

The two teams will enter the series at opposite ends of the spectrum, in terms of form and perhaps confidence.  India are fresh from a crushing T20 victory series over the Windies, while the regional team is still struggling to put together the pieces following a disastrous World Cup.

In addition, the Windies suffered 3-1 losses in their last two series against India.  Despite winning just a single game at the World Cup the Windies showed flashes of promise with individual batsmen getting starts but failing to deliver.

"Too many instances where we have gotten starts as individuals but never carried them deep into the innings, so that's one area we have pinpointed and once we've tackled that we have put ourselves in our very good position," he said ahead of the first ODI against India in Guyana.

"For me it's just a matter of remaining disciplined with the new ball, taking new-ball wickets and focus on their middle order and take the game from there," he added.

Windies legend Desmond Haynes has accused Cricket West Indies (CWI) of turning a cold shoulder to his aspirations of joining the regional cricket team’s coaching staff.

Haynes, once part of the most successful opening duo in West Indies cricket history, has expressed an interest in serving the regional team in the capacity of coach for the last couple of years. 

Despite receiving ringing endorsements from several former legends, Haynes was first overlooked under the Dave Cameron administration when Cricket West Indies (CWI) appointed Richard Pybus.  Under the new Ricky Skerrit-led association, which later pledged to use regional talent to fill vacancies, he was again overlooked as Floyd Reifer was named interim coach heading into the ICC World Cup.

“I would do everything in my power to assist West Indies cricket. I have sent in an application, I haven’t got a reply. So I don’t believe West Indies cricket is interested in me,” Haynes said in a recent interview with Wisden Cricket.

“I sent in an application and the CEO said he’d pass it onto Jimmy Adams [West Indies’ director of cricket]. So nothing’s happening. It’s that lack of respect – I think I deserve a reply just saying, ‘Desmond, we’re working on it’,” he added.

“It got to a stage where I sent an application in February and they name an interim coach in Reifer; they’re preparing for the World Cup and they get [Ramnaresh] Sarwan to help with the batting. They’re obviously sending a message that they definitely don’t want me around West Indies cricket.”

Windies skipper Carlos Brathwaite was left to rue another sub-par performance with the bat as India secured a 7-wickets win, in the ultimate match of the T20 series, at Providence Stadium and with it a 3-0 sweep of the regional team.

After losing the toss and being sent to bat, the Windies found themselves in early trouble when they lost Sunil Narine (2) to the bowling of Deepak Chahar.  Chahar would go on to remove Evin Lewis (10) and Shimron Hetmyer (1) en route to man of the match honours.  Once again, the regional team’s top order had failed to fire, losing their first three wickets for 14 runs.

Experienced middle-order batsman Kieron Pollard brought some respectability back to the innings after scoring a quick 58 from 45 balls, before being bowled by Navdeep Saini.  Rovman Powell also did his best to add to the total with an unbeaten 32 from 20 balls, as the Windies fought to 146 for 6.  In reply, half-centuries from India captain Virat Kohli (59) and Risbah Pant (65*) ensured that the visitors chased down the target with relative ease.  O’Shane Thomas was the best of the Windies bowlers after ending with figures of 2 for 29.

"We didn't start well with the bat again. Kudos to Pollard. As a team, we talked about progress, we took it to the last over. We knew 140 was below par but the bowlers fought again,” Brathwaite said.

“I'm not sure why the top-order isn't firing. Today, we didn't start well - if the top three play the way they do, we may have to take some decisions, but if they play how we know they play, we can get 180 easily,” he added.

“I, personally, need to perform as skipper. We have had some changes in the squad, so we need to establish ourselves as a unit further. We have seen some restructuring in batting from game to game and we are still searching for our perfect batting."

India completed a Twenty20 series whitewash of West Indies with a dominant seven-wicket victory in the third and final match in Guyana on Tuesday.

The tourists had already clinched the series with a pair of victories at Lauderhill in the United States, and they cruised in their chase of 147 at Providence Stadium.

Kieron Pollard hit six maximums in his 58 to help the Windies recover from 14-3 to 146-6 after Deepak Chahar produced a devastating spell, taking 3-4 in just his second T20 international.

However, that total still proved well short of what was required as captain Virat Kohli (59) and Rishabh Pant (65 not out) combined for a third-wicket partnership of 106 as India reached 150-3 with five balls to spare.

The focus will now shift to a three-match ODI series, in which the Windies will need to start their innings in significantly better fashion after losing three wickets in the first four overs to Chahar.

Sunil Narine hit him to mid on in the second over and Evin Lewis and Shimron Hetmyer were each trapped lbw two overs later.

Pollard put on stands of 66 with Nicholas Pooran and 25 with Rovman Powell, who finished unbeaten on 32 and had to do the bulk of the work at the death after Carlos Brathwaite (10) went to Chahar's cousin and debutant Rahul.

Oshane Thomas claimed the early wicket of Shikhar Dhawan and Fabian Allen removed KL Rahul as the Windies attempted to defend their score.

Kohli and Pant took the game away from the reigning T20 world champions, though, the captain striking six fours while Pant hit four sixes to wrap up a 3-0 series win in style.

The Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) is likely to face a fine, in addition to a bill for reimbursement, after the embarrassing fiasco that forced the team to withdraw from the CONCACAF U-15 Championships last week.

The Jamaicans were originally slated to compete in Group D, alongside Costa Rica, Portugal and Barbados.  The team was, however, forced to pull out of the tournament as not enough players were able to acquire US visa in time.

According to JFF General Secretary Dalton Wint, the organization was unable to secure emergency visa appointments for most of the team, following the US Embassy’s inability to handle the request.   Wint explained that the reason given was that the embassy was short-staffed during the Independence Day holiday period.  Only five of the 21 players held valid travel documents. 

Based on CONCACAF statues the JFF could be in hot water.  The regulations state that ‘if a team withdraws before the start of the competition, they will be fined US$10,000’. The Jamaica Football organizing body could also foreseeably be asked to reimburse CONCACAF and the Local Organising Committee (LOC) for any costs incurred as a result of its proposed involvement or eventual non-involvement.

Jamaican sprint hurdler Michael O’Hara ran a new personal best 13.61 to win the 100m hurdles at the 2019 LEAP Meeting in Loughborough, England on Tuesday.

Rising Jamaican sprint phenom Briana Williams has admitted the country’s reverence for the sport of track and field made it an easy decision to choose the tiny Caribbean island over the United States.

The 17-year-old Williams is considered one of the brightest up and coming prospects in the sport of athletics. In fact, the sprinter is expected to follow a long line of exceptional Jamaican sprinters, the likes of which include Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Elaine Thompson and the legendary Usain Bolt. 

Williams was, however, born in the United States, a country that has a proud track and field legacy of its own.  For the diminutive young sprinter, however, the choice between the track and field rivals was always a straight forward one.

“I was grown up in the Jamaica tradition way.  All the time when I was watching the Olympics, I would see Bolt and Shelly-Ann winning and think I want to be like them,” Williams said recently, in a podcast with the Olympic Channel.

“America has football, baseball they are more fans of that. In Jamaica, they show support to their track athletes and I like that.  In America, there is track but it's not at the same level.  When the Jamaica athletes are at the Olympics or World Championships, there is screaming in the middle of the streets and people cheering them on.  I like that culture more,” she added.  

Boldon, the Trinidad and Tobago Olympic bronze medalist, was in complete agreement.  Like Williams, Boldon could also have represented Jamaica as he was born in Port of Spain to a Jamaican mother.

“Even me being from Trinidad and Tobago, sometimes track and field athletes, despite us having the bulk of our Olympic medals, are not as revered in Trinidad and Tobago, like it is in Jamaica,” Boldon said.

“Many times during my career, when I saw the support for Jamaican athletes, I used to saw wow maybe Jamaica should have been the place I ran for because it just matters more," he added.

Williams, the World U-20 sprint double Champion, will represent Jamaica at the Doha World Championships later this year.   

Jamaica are scheduled to kick off their 2019-2020 CONCACAF Nation's League campaign against Antigua and Barbuda, at the Montego Bay Sports Complex in September, based on a newly released schedule.

The opening round of the tournament will feature some 34 matches overall, with teams placed in three groups.  The competition will also feature all 41 member associations of the Concacaf region in the same competition for the first time.

The Jamaicans kick off the competition in League B after finishing eighth in the qualifiers earlier this year.  In League A, Trinidad and Tobago will look to beginning putting a poor Gold Cup campaign behind them when they face Martinique.  Cuba, who also struggled to make a positive impression at the tournament, will face Canada in a rematch of a Gold Cup group contest.  The Caribbean team will be hoping for a much better showing this time around having been trounced 7-0 on that occasion.

 Mexico, USA, Costa Rica, and Honduras, who are all top-ranked in the three-team League A groups, will begin their participation in the tournament in October and November.  The winners of each Nations League A group will qualify to the Final Championship that will now be played in June and will determine the champion of the new competition.

Group winners from Leagues B and League C will be promoted to League A and B, respectively, while the teams at the bottom of each League A and League B groups will be relegated to League B and C, respectively.

 

2019-2020 Concacaf Nations League Group Stage Schedule
*In ET and home team listed first

Thursday, September 5, 2019
(C) 3:00 PM US Virgin Islands vs Cayman Islands – Bethlehem Soccer Complex, US Virgin Islands
(C) 6:00 PM Barbados vs Saint Martin – Astro Turf Wildey Stadium, Barbados
(A) 6:00 PM Bermuda vs Panama – Bermuda National Sport Center, Bermuda
(B) 6:00 PM Grenada vs St. Kitts and Nevis – Kirani James Athletic Stadium, Grenada
(B) 3:00 PM Dominica vs Suriname – Windsor Park Sports Stadium, Dominica
(B) 8:00 PM French Guiana vs Belize – Stade du Dr. Edmard Lama, French Guiana
(B) 8:00 PM Nicaragua vs St. Vincent and the Grenadines – Estadio Nacional, Nicaragua
(C) 10:00 PM Guatemala vs Anguilla – Doroteo Guamuch Flores, Guatemala

Friday, September 6, 2019
(C) 3:00 PM Bonaire vs British Virgin Islands – Stadion Ergilio Hato, Curacao
(A) 6:00 PM Martinique vs Trinidad & Tobago – Stade Pierre Aliker, Martinique
(B) 7:00 PM Aruba vs Guyana – Stadion Ergilio Hato, Curacao
(B) 8:00 PM Jamaica vs Antigua and Barbuda – Montego Bay Sports Complex, Jamaica

Saturday, September 7, 2019
(B) 3:00 PM Montserrat vs Dominican Republic – Blake’s Football Complex, Montserrat
(C) 5:00 PM Guadeloupe vs Sint Maarten – Rene Serge Nabajoth, Guadeloupe
(A) 6:00 PM Curacao vs Haiti – Stadion Ergilio Hato, Curacao
(A) 8:00 PM Canada vs Cuba – BMO Field, Canada
(B) 10:00 PM El Salvador vs St. Lucia – Estadio Cuscatlan, El Salvador

Sunday, September 8, 2019
(C) 3:00 PM Saint Martin vs US Virgin Islands – Raymond Gordon Ernest Guishard Technical Center, Anguilla
(B) 6:00 PM Belize vs Grenada – Isidro Beoton Stadium, Belize
(B) 6:00 PM St. Vincent and the Grenadines vs Dominica – Arnos Vale Stadium, St. Vincent and the Grenadines
(B) 6:00 PM Suriname vs Nicaragua – Andre Kamperveen Stadion, Suriname
(B) 7:00 PM St. Kitts and Nevis vs French Guiana – Warner Park, St. Kitts and Nevis
(C) 7:30 PM Cayman Islands vs Barbados – Truman Bodden Sports Complex, Cayman Islands
(A) 9:00 PM Panama vs Bermuda – Rommel Fernandez, Panama

Monday, September 9, 2019
(B) 3:00 PM Antigua and Barbuda vs Aruba – Sir Vivian Richards Stadium, Antigua and Barbuda
(C) 6:00 PM Bahamas vs Bonaire – Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium, Bahamas
(B) 7:00 PM Guyana vs Jamaica – Leonora National Track & Field Center, Guyana
(A) 9:00 PM Trinidad & Tobago vs Martinique – Ato Boldon Stadium, Trinidad & Tobago

Tuesday, September 10, 2019
(C) 2:00 PM Puerto Rico vs Guatemala – Juan Ramon Loubriel, Puerto Rico
(C) 3:00 PM Turks and Caicos Islands vs Guadeloupe – TCIFA National Academy , Turks and Caicos Islands
(B) 4:00 PM Montserrat vs St. Lucia – Blake’s Football Complex, Montserrat
(B) 6:00 PM Dominican Republic vs El Salvador – Felix Sanchez, Dominican Republic
(A) 6:00 PM Haiti vs Curacao – Sylvio Cator, Haiti
(A) 7:15 PM Cuba vs Canada – Truman Bodden Sports Complex, Cayman Island

Cricket West Indies selectors have called all-rounder Fabian Allen to replace Khary Pierre for the third and final T20 International against India in Guyana on Tuesday.

MLS has backed Philadelphia Union captain Alejandro Bedoya's stand against gun violence after he labeled the situation in the United States as "absurd" in the wake of mass shootings over the weekend in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio.

Bedoya, who opened the scoring in Philadelphia's 5-1 thrashing of DC United, took his chance to send a message to the nation's leaders.

After finding the bet, Bedoya ran toward an on-field microphone and shouted: "Congress, do something now. End gun violence. Let's go!"

In response, MLS released a statement that didn't mention Bedoya specifically but alluded to his actions: "The Major League Soccer family joins everyone in grieving for the loss of lives in Texas and Ohio, and we understand that our players and staff have strong and passionate views on this issue.”

The weekend shootings resulted in the deaths of 30 people, sparking fresh calls for politicians to address the country's gun laws.

Speaking after Sunday's game, Bedoya, 32, said he wanted to take his chance to push for change.

"It's absurd. I'm not going to sit idly and watch this stuff happen and not say something," the former USA international told a news conference.

"Before I'm an athlete, before I'm a soccer player, I'm a human being first. This stuff affects me. I've got kids. I mean, I can't be the only one here... all you guys I'm sure feel the same way in this day and age, in our society.

"I'm dropping my kids off at school and I'm looking around paranoid, thinking about exit strategy, when I'm at the mall, when I'm at a movie theater, when I'm at a concert, a festival down the street, big gatherings.

"Something's got to be done. It's got to the point where we've almost become numb to it and that's a big problem."

By Monday, it was clear that MLS wouldn't punish Bedoya for his actions, a possibility that Bedoya was unfazed by because, he said, he had to stand up for what he believed in.

"I don't care. Fine me if they want. I've got to make a stand. Like I said, I'm a human being before I'm an athlete, you know what I mean, and that should be everybody here," he said.

"We're all human beings, we're all affected by this type of stuff. I don't know about you but my kids man... it's scary, man, to think about what can happen at any time, right now, in this day and age, here in America."

Philadelphia Union captain Alejandro Bedoya explained his stand against gun violence, labelling the situation in the United States as "absurd".

Bedoya opened the scoring in Philadelphia's 5-1 thrashing of 10-man DC United in MLS on Sunday and the midfielder took his chance to send a message to the nation's leaders.

Mass shootings in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio over the weekend resulted in the deaths of 29 people, sparking fresh calls for politicians to address the country's gun laws.

After scoring, Bedoya ran towards an on-field microphone and shouted: "Congress, do something now. End gun violence. Let's go!"

Speaking after the game, the 32-year-old said he wanted to take his chance to push for change.

"It's absurd. I'm not going to sit idly and watch this stuff happen and not say something," the former USA international told a news conference.

"Before I'm an athlete, before I'm a soccer player, I'm a human being first. This stuff affects me. I've got kids. I mean, I can't be the only one here... all you guys I'm sure feel the same way in this day and age, in our society.

"I'm dropping my kids off at school and I'm looking around paranoid, thinking about exit strategy, when I'm at the mall, when I'm at a movie theatre, when I'm at a concert, a festival down the street, big gatherings.

"Something's got to be done. It's got to the point where we've almost become numb to it and that's a big problem."

Bedoya is unfazed by the possibility of sanctions from MLS officials, saying he had to stand up for what he believed in.

"I don't care. Fine me if they want. I've got to make a stand. Like I said, I'm a human being before I'm an athlete, you know what I mean, and that should be everybody here," he said.

"We're all human beings, we're all affected by this type of stuff. I don't know about you but my kids man... it's scary, man, to think about what can happen at any time, right now, in this day and age, here in America."

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