Guingamp forward Nathael Julan has died at the age of 23, the Ligue 2 club announced on Friday.

According to local reports, the player was involved in a car accident on the road to Pordic, near the town of Saint-Brieuc.

Guingamp confirmed the news via a statement, saying: "The club had the immense pain of learning this afternoon of the accidental death of their player Nathael Julan.

"On this tragic day all the members of the club join together to send their condolences to Nathael's family."

Guingamp have cancelled a friendly with Concarneau on Saturday following the news.

Julan began his career with Le Havre before joining Guingamp in 2018.

He made 10 appearances for the club in Ligue 1 in 2018-19 and a further three in cup competitions before joining Valenciennes on loan for the rest of the season. He scored twice in 13 league appearances for Olivier Guegan's side.

Julan then played in the 3-3 Ligue 2 draw with Grenoble in July, Guingamp's first competitive game after being relegated to France's second tier.

Despite having a torrid time of international cricket over the last year and a half, three women from the West Indies side have still been picked as part of this decade’s best XI, according to ESPN.

Stafanie Taylor, who scored the most One-Day International runs and is one of the three highest run-scorers in the World in T20 Internationals over the course of the decade, was a shoo-in, while all-rounding legend from the region, Deandra Dottin, also had no equal.

As a bowler, Anisa Mohammed has been the standout spinner this decade and so has also taken her place in the XI.

Taylor, according to ESPN, is joined at the top of the order by New Zealand’s Suzie Bates, while at number three, Australia’s Meg Lanning was a sure pick. At four in the batting line-up comes Indian great, Mithali Raj, who averaged 55.31 in ODIs this decade and 37.18 in T20Is.

England wicketkeeper Sarah Taylor is set to walk at five in the team of the decade, while Australia’s Ellyse Perry and Dottin prop up the rest of the middle order.

The specialist bowlers in the side are made up of Shagnim Ismail, England veteran Anya Shrubsole, Mohammed and South Africa’s Dane van Niekerk.

This decade, Taylor scored 3993 runs at an average of 45.89, which included four centuries and 32 half-centuries. In T20Is, the 28-year-old West Indies captain managed 2639 runs at an average of 35.66 including 14 half-centuries.

Dottin’s all-round cricket has been impressive. She scored 2349 runs in ODIs this decade while taking 64 wickets. In T20Is the all-rounder was just as impressive, scoring 2175 runs while taking 58 wickets.

Mohammed has been the standout bowler this decade, taking an incredible 142 wickets in ODIs over the period. In 2011, for instance, the offspinner managed to remove 37 scalps from just 13 games. She has taken five or more wickets on three occasions since 2010.

In T20Is, where batters reign supreme, Mohammed was also brilliant, bagging 102 wickets with best figures of 5/12. She took five or more wickets twice in the period and had four for nine in 2010 and 2011.

West Indies Women’s captain, Stafanie Taylor, has scored the most One-Day International runs over the last decade of her career.

According to the statistics, Taylor, who led the West Indies women to a historic T20 World Cup win, has interestingly, done better in the longer format of the game, even though her team has only managed a runner up finish on the World stage.

This decade, Taylor has scored 3993 runs at a healthy average of 45.89.

Those runs mean she finishes the decade ahead of the prolific Meg Lanning, the Australian scoring 3,693 runs at an average of 52.75.

Taylor also bested another prolific scorer in the women’s game today, New Zealand’s Suzie Bates, who scored 3,621 runs this decade at an average of 45.26.

Taylor, on her way to amassing the total scored, scored the third-highest total among women in an ODI, slamming 171 against Sri Lanka in the 2013 World Cup.

Also along the way, she scored four centuries with two of those coming in 2013.

The all-rounder also scored 32 half-centuries over the period, with 2019 her most productive, where she scored five of them.

Though Taylor has not scored a century since 2013, she has consistently come close, scoring 95, 98 not out, 85, 90, 90, and 94 in the year’s following.

Taylor, a Jamaican, has opened for West Indies Women since she was a teenager, and is known for her determined accumulation of runs. At just 19, she became the youngest woman to reach 1000 ODI runs.

Given the two T20 World Cups under the belt of the West Indies, it may be no surprise that the Caribbean side has dominated ESPN’s best XI in the format over the last decade.

ESPN had come up with a list of its best XI in Test, One-Day and T20 Internationals and while there were no West Indians in the two longer formats of the game, they may have made up for it in the shortest.

At the top of the order comes Chris Gayle, T20’s all-time leading run-scorer. Interestingly, the opening spots have been covered by the West Indies with Sunil Narine earning a pick for his innovative pinch-hitting at the top of the order.

India’s Virat Kohli comes at number three in the batting line-up, with South Africa’s AB de Villiers locking down number four.

At five, ESPN has gone with another Indian in veteran Mahendra Singh Doni before turning again to the Caribbean where West Indies white-ball captain Kieron Pollard and Andre Russell can decide who bats six and seven.

At number eight, the best in the world this decade, according to the writers at ESPN, comes Dwayne Bravo before the leg-spin option of Rashid Khan. Narine, is, of course, the other spinner in the side.

Sri Lankan great, Lasith Malinga makes the best team of the decade next, while Jasprith Bumrah finds his way into the side as the second seamer. The two are seen as the best death bowlers in the world because of their ability to bowl Yorkers.

Out with the old and in with the new.

Happy new year! Happy new decade! To your health, and to your wealth. May your future be prosperous and your family live in abundance.

Remember when we'd greet each other with such forceful cheer, way back in 2020? When Donald Trump was merely a White House tweeting machine, and not yet a challenger to Jack Nicklaus' golf majors record.

This is a message dispatched from Tuesday, January 1, 2030, and you've just swallowed the theory that the so-called former "commander-in-cheat" might legitimately win not one golf tournament but upwards of 18 against the world's elite.

The funny thing is, had it happened, perhaps it would not have been the most seismic event of the past 10 years - a turbulent, anything-goes period in sporting history.

Some will tell you sport in the 2020s reached its nadir when FIFA's executive committee needed three days of meetings before ruling out staging the 2029 Club World Cup in the cities of Chernobyl and Pripyat. You can't, it turns out, carry out urban regeneration within a nuclear exclusion zone, not even with the best will in the world and the 100% backing of CONMEBOL.

Others will look to the NFL appointing Sarah Sanders as its commissioner. Here, in any case, is an advance snapshot of the decade you're about to live through.

A 39th game in the Premier League ... and goodbye to VAR! 

By the dawn of the 2020s nobody doubted heads could be turned by great wedges of cash. The Premier League's long-mooted '39th game' finally got the green light, with an extra round of fixtures being staged in the United States in 2023 - predictably overshadowed by a routine weekend of college football.

Away from dollar-driven 'progress', 2023 also saw the VAR system abolished by incoming FIFA president and career goal-hanger Gary Lineker. No one countenanced ever speaking of VAR again.

Roger… and still not out!

Roger Federer has never added to those 20 grand slam titles he tallied in the '00s and '10s, and agonisingly he saw Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic both nudge one ahead of him on the all-time list in the early 2020s. Where are Rafa and Nole now though? In an incontestable, quite glorious triumph for Team Federer, Roger is rolling on at the age of 48, a knock-in for those Wimbledon and US Open wild cards and still a fixture in Anna Wintour's wildest dreams.

In 2026, Federer partnered his 16-year-old daughter Myla Rose in mixed doubles at the Australian Open. "I've always wanted to keep going until my grandchildren have the chance to see me play, but of course so many people want to write me off," said Roger in a post-match interview.

Federer, hunting that elusive 21st major, has reached the third round of a major only twice since 2022. The year 2022, coincidentally, saw Serena Williams finally match and then pass Margaret Court's women’s tour record of 24 singles slams, immediately quitting tennis and public life at the age of 40 for a surprising second career in taxidermy. Cross the formidable Serena these days and you really can get stuffed.

Run off track

Peeved with persistent pee-test perniciousness, the plug was pulled on Olympic athletics six months out from Los Angeles 2028. To assuage the choking loss of track and field, the sport was substituted on the Memorial Coliseum stadium schedules by daily NFL games, thus guaranteeing stunning television audiences and spectacular financial success, feathering the IOC nest. The rest of the world audience, as per, embraced whatever sport in which their country had concocted a way to become world-beaters since the Tokyo Olympics. America's dominance of the shooting proved a sore point with some observers, given the successful dismantling of the NRA by President Michelle Obama's administration.

Hearn in space

'No context' in 2019, and no gravity by 2028, boxing promoter Eddie Hearn teamed up in a co-promotion with Elon Musk's SpaceX corporation to announce boxing's first showdown on the International Space Station. The Matchroom boss guffawed and called the experience "different gravy" on a recce trip, yet not one astronaut on the ISS laughed back nor posted a three-second clip straight to Twitter. Even from a height of 250 miles, the world instantly felt a better place.

Coming out was the new staying in

A host of sports stars – you'll recognise some of the names, but all in good time - came out as proud members of the LGBTQ+ community over the last decade. The enlightened public majority welcomed the healthy cultural shift that made it possible, and an ignorant minority was soon shouted down. After years of suppressing their true selves in public, this generation of athletes was able to thrive in large parts of the world. There's no punchline here, just the hope we don't screw this one up in the years ahead.

The future's female, are we nearly there yet?

How has the gender gap closed over the course of the 2020s, you wonder? Here's an answer: significantly but not sufficiently.

Sure, there's been a woman reaching the final of the darts world championship, half a dozen female Formula One drivers, Sam Kerr grabbed a handful of A-League goals when guesting for Perth Glory, and we've seen the first prominent football managers crossing over to the men’s game (Emma Hayes spent two years at Fulham, Corinne Diacre had 15 months with Lille, Laura Harvey is bossing the Seattle Sounders and Sarina Wiegman is sporting director of PSV).

The future's better: stadiums are now packed for women's World Cups in football, rugby and cricket.

Squabbling over tennis prize money calmed when grand slams cut matches across the board to best-of-three-set contests, yet achieving outright equality across the sporting spectrum will be one for the 2030s crew to take on.

And finally…

Football 'came home', with England driven to their 2026 World Cup triumph by a combination of Jurgen Klopp's astute management, Harvey Elliott's mastery of the number 10 role, and Real Madrid frontman Dominic Calvert-Lewin's irresistible finishing.

Just one more thing…

Don't believe everything you read. That last memory of the decade? Bigly fake news. To the delight of their many World Cup frenemies, the England football team is still FAILING.

The evolving world of sport means a new decade is likely to see widespread change.

With superstars like Lionel Messi, LeBron James, Roger Federer and Lewis Hamilton unlikely to be plying their trades in 2030, the stage is set for new names to come to the fore.

Omnisport's team of writers have tipped 20 20-year-olds to do just that over the next 10 years.

 

Men's football: Joao Felix

A €126m move from Benfica to Atletico Madrid made Joao Felix the second most expensive teenager in football history. His career in LaLiga is yet to truly ignite but the forward's lavish gifts are beyond doubt as he faces up to the decade when Cristiano Ronaldo will leave the stage for their native Portugal. Joao Felix is the anointed heir.

Basketball: Luka Doncic

The 2018 EuroLeague MVP and 2019 NBA Rookie of the Year, Doncic's incredible rise has continued unchecked this season – he is averaging 28.8 points, 9.5 rebounds and 9.0 assists for the Dallas Mavericks. He should earn a first All-Star appearance this season and make his bow in the playoffs, where you would expect to see him featuring regularly in the coming years.

Cricket: Prithvi Shaw

Opening batsman Shaw became the youngest Indian to score a Test hundred on debut in 2018 and followed that up with a half-century in his second appearance. However, last year was one to forget for Shaw, who had injury problems before serving a six-month doping ban having taken a substance typically found in cough syrups. A first-class double hundred last month suggests he is ready to make up for lost time.

Tennis: Marketa Vondrousova

Although she was unable to win a title on the WTA Tour in 2019, Vondrousova was the runner-up at the French Open – one of three final appearances last year – and having risen to 16th in the world rankings she looks set to break the top 10 soon. The Czech's unorthodox playing style and penchant for drop shots makes her a particularly entertaining watch.

Formula One: Lando Norris

Norris enjoyed an excellent debut season in Formula One, helping McLaren to an impressive fourth place in the constructors' championship. After landing three straight points finishes to end the year, he carries momentum into 2020 and looks capable of challenging Charles Leclerc and Max Verstappen over the next 10 years.

UFC: Chase Hooper

Featherweight Hooper was awarded a development deal after winning the second season of Dana White's Tuesday Night Contender Series in 2018 and is the youngest fighter on the UFC roster. He improved his unbeaten mixed martial arts record to 8-0-1 by stopping David Teymur in the first round of a thoroughly impressive UFC debut in December.

American football: Trevor Lawrence

The NFL is blessed with talented young quarterbacks like Patrick Mahomes, Lamar Jackson and Deshaun Watson, but the potential star of the 2020s will not enter the league until 2021 at the earliest. Clemson's Lawrence possess the size, skill and nerve to succeed at the next level. He is still yet to lose a game in college and is one win away from back-to-back National Championships.

Sport climbing: Janja Garnbret

Sport climbing will make its Olympic debut at Tokyo 2020 and Garnbret is a favourite for success. She successfully defended her bouldering and combined titles at last year's world championships and added gold in the lead discipline. The Slovenian's tally of 14 International Federation of Sport Climbing titles is unprecedented.

Rugby league: Tom Flegler

Front-rower Flegler enjoyed a hugely promising breakthrough year with Brisbane Broncos in 2019, featuring 23 times in his maiden campaign. He has reportedly knocked back a host of lucrative offers to remain with Brisbane in 2020 and will now aim to make an even bigger impact.

Women's football: Georgia Stanway

Vastly experienced for her age, Stanway joined Manchester City from Blackburn Rovers and made her Women's Super League debut at 16 in 2015. She won her second FA Cup with a goalscoring player-of-the-match display as City beat West Ham 3-0 in 2019's Wembley final and was the youngest member of an England squad Phil Neville led to the World Cup semi-finals. If the Lionesses are to take the next step over the coming decade, expect Stanway to play a vital role.

Rugby union: Marcus Smith

Harlequins fly-half Smith is knocking on the door for full England selection after an impressive first two years of his club career. He was man of the match in last July's win over Barbarians, which fans of Eddie Jones' side will hope is a sign of things to come over the next decade.

Golf: Matthew Wolff

The PGA Tour welcomed a host of talented rookies in 2019, but Wolff may just be the best of the bunch. A standout college player with an unorthodox swing that generates enormous power, he won last July's 3M Open in only his third professional start.

MotoGP: Fabio Quartararo

After Jorge Lorenzo, the only man to defeat Marc Marquez in a MotoGP world championship, retired, and with Valentino Rossi nearing the end of his career, fans are looking to the next generation. That group looks set to be led by Quartararo, who will ride a factory-spec Yamaha for 2020 after claiming six pole positions and seven podiums in a magnificent rookie season.

Golf: Nasa Hataoka

Already fifth in the women's world rankings, Hataoka has claimed three LPGA Tour titles in the past 18 months, after becoming the first amateur to win a major on the Japan LPGA Tour back in 2016.

Baseball: Vladimir Guerrero Jnr

Guerrero has a lot to live up to but has already shown enough to suggest he may follow his father into baseball's Hall of Fame. Having signed for the Toronto Blue Jays as a free agent in 2015, Guerrero served his time in the minors before making his debut in the Major Leagues last April. He spent the rest of his maiden season displaying the kind of power that has marked him out as a star of the future, hitting .272, mashing 15 home runs and knocking in 69 RBI. By the end of the next decade, his may well be the face of baseball.

Ice Hockey: Quinn Hughes

Hughes, who could not even debut for the Vancouver Canucks until he recovered from an ankle injury in March, is an elite defenseman who also sat top of the rookie assist chart in late December.

Swimming: Michael Andrew

This year is an Olympic one and for the first time since the 1996 Games, Michael Phelps will not be in the pool. The United States needs a new swimming hero, and the hope is that Phelps' namesake can be the next star. Andrew was the youngest US swimmer to ever turn professional when he did so at 14 and, having finished fourth in the 50 metres butterfly at the 2019 World Aquatics Championships, he appears primed to be a breakout star in Tokyo.

Tennis: Denis Shapovalov

Shapovalov finished 2019 at a career-high ATP ranking of 15th, having won his first title in Stockholm. Expect his threat at the 2020 majors to be very real.

Athletics: Sydney McLaughlin

At the 2019 World Athletics Championships in Doha, gold in the 4x400 metres relay followed silver in the 400m hurdles for McLaughlin. Only a Dalilah Muhammad world record was enough to deny her the victory.

Boxing: Joseph Adorno

Currently plying his trade in the lightweight division, Adorno was brought up in Puerto Rico and his thunderous left hook has drawn comparisons to Miguel Cotto – the great four-weight world champion hailing from that boxing-mad island. Promoters Top Rank will look to step up Adorno's level of opposition in 2020, although anyone climbing into the corner opposite a young man boasting a 14-0 record with 12 knockouts should make sure they get well paid.

Ireland coach Graham Ford insists the team will arrive full of confidence heading into a limited over series against the West Indies at the turn of the New Year.

The teams are scheduled to play a three-match series in both the ODI and Twenty20 format, which will be the first full series for the 9th ranked Windies and 11th ranked Ireland.  The Windies are expected to be a significant challenge for the Irish following a strong showing against top-ranked India under new captain Kieron Pollard.  Ford, however, insists that the tourist will see the tour as one filled with infinite possibilities.

“There is a confidence and self-belief around the camp which comes from recent successes, and we’re looking to build on that in 2020,” Ford said in a recent interview.

 “Being our first-ever multi-format tour of the Caribbean, there is certainly a bit of a buzz around the squad and come the seventh of January, we’ll be more than ready to begin what is an exciting year in Irish cricket,” he added.

"We are very aware of the big challenge that we have here playing away from home coming out of the winter with only indoor training. The West Indies have been playing really good cricket and just pushed the number one team in the world (India) all the way and could have come out on top."

The first ODI scheduled to bowl off in a week’s time at the Kensington Oval.   The second ODI is also scheduled for Kensington Oval on January 9, with the Grenada National Stadium hosting the final ODI.

Grenada will be the venue for the opening T20 international on January 12 before Warner Park in St Kitts will host to back-to-back matches on January 18 and 19.

West Indies have beaten Ireland in seven of 10 ODIs and two of four T20s to date.

West Indies coach Phil Simmons is not be concerned that the life-changing contract awarded to Sheldon Cottrell to play for the Kings XI Punjab in this season’s Indian Premier League (IPL) will impact his cricket.

Specialist fielding coach, Trevor Penney, has been named as an assistant to West Indies head coach, Phil Simmons, with specific responsibility for white-ball cricket.

Penney will begin a two-year contract with the West Indies on January 2, 2019, with the hopes of getting the team ready for the Colonial Medical Insurance One-Day International series against Ireland at home.

That series will comprise three ODI games. There will also be three Sandals T/20 Internationals to consider against the Irishmen, both encounters from January 7-19.

The 51-year-old Penny, himself a former player for Warwickshire, has had stints as head coach of Sri Lanka, one as fielding coach of India, as well as was a consultant coach to the Netherlands.

Penney also comes to the position with experience from the Indian Premier League (IPL), where he served as assistant coach at the King’s XI Punjab, Deccan Chargers and the Kolkata Knight Riders. He also provided his services to the St Lucia Zouks and to the St Kitts & Nevis Patriots in the Hero Caribbean Premier League (CPL). Most recently he helped the Barbados Tridents to their second lien on the CPL trophy.

There he was assisting Simmons, who believes him to be well suited for his latest tour of duty.

“Trevor is an excellent coach and has demonstrated this everywhere he has worked. He has huge experience with Sri Lanka and India at the highest international level, and in most T20 leagues around the world including the CPL. He brings enormous energy and is very well respected by all the players,” said Simmons.

Penney believes he is also a good fit, especially because of the experience he has with the very players who make up the white ball squads.

“I’m thrilled and excited to be given this opportunity to work with this brilliant bunch of cricketers and staff led by Kieron Pollard and Phil Simmons. I’ve been lucky enough over the last few years to work with several members of the squad and the Caribbean is like ‘home away from home’ for me being involved in the CPL,” said Penney.

 

 

 

Penney is very aware that the West Indies have suffered a decline in fortunes in T20 cricket, where they have won two World Cups and wants to get them back to a stage where they are a dangerous outfit.

“We have two big T20 World Cups coming up (in Australia 2020 and India 2021) and it’s my aim to try and improve everybody and be as good as we can and hopefully win those two major ICC events for the great people of the West Indies.”

 

MATCH SCHEDULE

 

Saturday, Jan 4: warm-up vs CWI President’s XI – Three Ws Oval, Barbados

 

Tuesday, Jan 7: 1st Colonial Medical Insurance ODI – Kensington Oval, Barbados 

 

Thursday, Jan 9: 2nd Colonial Medical Insurance ODI – Kensington Oval

 

Sunday, Jan 12: 3rd Colonial Medical Insurance ODI – Grenada National Stadium, Grenada

 

Wednesday, Jan 15: 1st Sandals Resorts T20I – Grenada National Stadium 

 

Saturday, Jan 18: 2nd Sandals Resorts T20I – Warner Park, St Kitts

 

Sunday, Jan 19: 3rd Sandals Resorts T20I – Warner Park

 

 

 

TEAM MANAGEMENT

 

Phil Simmons (Head Coach)

 

Rawl Lewis (Team Manager)

 

Roddy Estwick (Assistant Coach)

 

Trevor Penney (Assistant Coach)

 

Monty Desai (Batting Coach)

 

Ronald Rogers (Strength & Conditioning Coach)

 

Denis Byam (Physiotherapist)

 

A.R. Srikkanth (Team Analyst)

 

Zephyrinus Nicholas (Massage Therapist)

 

Philip Spooner (Media Manager)

MLS expansion franchise Inter Miami have appointed Diego Alonso as their first head coach.

Inter - co-owned by former England captain David Beckham - will enter MLS in 2020 and have already made a host of signings, including Designated Player Matias Pellegrini, but had been without a coach until Monday.

Ex-Monterrey boss Alonso was confirmed in the role, having been out of management since September.

Alonso, who was capped by Uruguay as a player, was sacked by Monterrey just four months after winning the CONCACAF Champions League - a title he also claimed with Pachuca in 2017.

The 44-year-old also won the 2016 Clausura in Liga MX with Pachuca.

Inter sporting director Paul McDonough said in a statement: "In Diego, we found a manager that fits our culture and has a strong desire to build a winning club for our fans.

"He brings a lot of experience and championship-winning mentality as we begin our drive to be among the best clubs in the Americas.

"We have big aspirations for our club and believe Diego has the right drive, passion and leadership to accomplish our goals."

He left Cleveland for Miami, finally became a champion, went back to his beloved northeast Ohio, delivered on another title promise, then left for the Los Angeles Lakers and the next challenge. He played in eight straight finals. No NBA player won more games or more MVP awards over the last 10 years than he did. He started a school. He married his high school sweetheart.

"That's all?" LeBron James asked, feigning disbelief.

No, that's not all. Those were just some highlights of the last 10 years. There were many more, as the man called "King" spent the last decade reigning over all others — with no signs of slowing down.

 James is The Associated Press male athlete of the decade, adding his name to a list that includes Tiger Woods, Wayne Gretzky and Arnold Palmer. He was a runaway winner in a vote of AP member sports editors and AP beat writers, easily outpacing runner-up Tom Brady of the New England Patriots.

"You add another 10 years of learning and adversity, pitfalls, good, great, bad, and any smart person who wants to grow will learn from all those experiences," James, who turns 35 Monday, told the AP. "A decade ago, I just turned 25. I'm about to be 35 and I'm just in a better (place) in my life and have a better understanding of what I want to get out of life."

Usain Bolt of Jamaica was third for dominating the sprints at the 2012 and 2016 Olympics, soccer superstar Lionel Messi was fourth and Michael Phelps — the U.S. swimmer who retired as history's most decorated Olympian with 28 medals, 23 gold — was fifth.

Jamaica international and rising Bundesliga star Leon Bailey has been cautioned about his poor disciplinary record so far this season by his agent and guardian Craig Butler.

The 22-year-old Bayer Leverkusen winger has received two red cards in five appearances so far.  The dismissals, which came against FC Koln and Borussia Mönchengladbach were the first of his career. 

The player’s latest infringement, which occurred against Koln, was pushing his hand into the face of Kingsley Ehzibue.  Bailey has, as a result, been suspended for three Bundesliga games and handed a fine of €20,000. Butler has insisted the player’s recent trend is one that cannot continue.

"Of course, I talked to Leon about his red cards again,” Butler told Bild.

"Leon has to understand that defenders want to stop and provoke fast players,” he added.

“I told him that I would not come back to the stadium if it happened to him again.  It will be interesting to see whether this threat actually bears fruit.”

Bailey, who has scored three goals and claimed one man-of-the-match award so far this season, will miss the start of the second half of the season against Paderborn in two weeks time.

With the Olympics in Tokyo just months away, Japan has ramped up their preparations and showed their might on Saturday with a comprehensive 9-0 thrashing of Jamaica’s Young Reggae Boyz at the Transcosmos Stadium in Nagasaki.

The under 22s from Jamaica were no match for their hosts, who are also preparing for the Asian Cup next month, a competition which also acts as a qualifier for Tokyo.

Though Japan has already booked their place in Tokyo by virtue of being the hosts, they would still like to do well in the Asian Cup and have laid down a marker for their rivals.

Japan will be in Group B of the Under-23 Asian Cup, where they will first take on Saudi Arabia on January 9, 2020, before turning their attention to  Syria on the 12th.

Qatar is next for the Japan side before what they will hope are quarterfinal match-ups. There are four groups with the top two from each making the quarterfinal.

Reggae Boyz coach Theodore Whitmore was the man in charge of the under-22s, saying the encounter would have given him the chance to take a look at some of the emerging talent from the country with a bid to fitting them into senior World Cup qualification games.

West Indies Legend, iconic captain of the 1980s, Clive Lloyd will be knighted as part of the Queen’s New Year’s Honours List and will be joined by former opening batsman, Gordon Greenidge.

Lloyd and Greenidge are the latest member of former West Indies teams to receive knighthood, following greats like Sir Gary Sobers, Sir Everton Weekes, and Sir Vivian Richards.

Lloyd, who earned a CBE as early as 1993, was forced to wait on the prestigious honour because as a Guyanese citizen, knighthood would have to come directly from the queen, unlike is the case in Antigua where that country gave the honour to, Sir Vivian, Sir Curtly and Sir Richie directly.

Lloyd, who led the West Indies during its most successful era, is likely to have made the list for his contribution to cricket not with the Caribbean side but with English County outfit Lancashire, where he plied his trade for some 20 years.

Lancashire skipper at the time, Jack Bond, was full of praise for Lloyd, saying: “His value to Lancashire cannot be measured by ordinary standards.”

For the West Indies, Lloyd played 110 Tests, becoming the first player from the region to play over 100 games in the format, scoring 19 centuries and 39 half-centuries at an average of 46.67. His highest score was an unbeaten 242 against India in Mumbai to set up a series-deciding win for the West Indies.

Lloyd also led the West Indies to two World Cup titles, first in 1975, then again in 1979.

But Lloyd also contributed to West Indies cricket as an administrator, holding stints as a director of the West Indies Cricket Board as well as the team’s chairman of selectors.

Lloyd is particularly well remembered for ‘cometh the hour, cometh the man moments’, famously scoring a wonderful century in the final of the World Cup in 1975 at Lord’s.

Greenidge, meanwhile, a 68-year-old former opening batsman, has been conferred with the Order of St Michael and St George Knight Commander for “services to cricket and to the development of sport” on the overseas list.

Conde Riley, the Barbados Cricket Association president and Cricket West Indies director, has also been honoured for “services in the field of sport and in particular cricket administration”.

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