Teenager Rasmus Hojgaard displayed extraordinary nerve to win the Mauritius Open and claim a maiden European Tour title in only his fifth start.

The 18-year-old Dane birdied the final hole in regulation play to complete a 68 and earn a spot in a three-way play-off at 19 under with fellow rookie Antoine Rozner (69) and Renato Paratore (67).

Hojgaard then turned on the style when playing the 18th a further three times, twice recording birdies to match Rozner - as Paratore was eliminated - and then sealing victory with a wonderful eagle. Only Matteo Manassero and Danny Lee have triumphed on the European Tour at a younger age.

A stunning approach to around 10 feet set up Hojgaard's winning putt and the youngster, whose identical twin Nicolai finished second to Sergio Garcia at the KLM Open in September, was soon doused in champagne as he celebrated a momentous success.

"I can't put it into words right now. This is a dream come true," a soaked but smiling Hojgaard told Sky Sports. "I don't know what to say - it's amazing."

A par at the first play-off hole ended Paratore's hopes, but Rozner did nothing wrong and was on course for a third successive birdie in the play-off when Hojgaard drained his eagle putt.

Louis de Jager produced the best round of the day, a 64 featuring six front-nine birdies and an eagle at the 14th, to finish one shot behind the leading trio.

He was joined at 18 under by Benjamin Hebert (66), Grant Forrest (66) and Thomas Detry, whose wait for a first European Tour win goes on after he could only manage a 70 having begun the day in a share of the lead with Rozner and Calum Hill.

It was a miserable Sunday for Hill. The Scot triple-bogeyed the first and went around in 74 to finish tied-17th at 14 under.

Matt Jones denied a fast-finishing Louis Oosthuizen to secure his second Australian Open title in Sydney on Sunday.

Jones became a dual winner of the tournament after holding on for a one-stroke victory following his final-round 69 at The Australian Golf Club.

Winner of the Australian Open in 2015, Australian golfer Jones entered the final day with a three-shot advantage.

But 2010 Open Championship winner Oosthuizen (66) threatened to spoil the party when he eagled the 72nd hole and cut Jones' lead to just one stroke.

Jones, however, managed to save par on the par-five 18th to claim the Stonehaven Cup at 15 under.

He joins an elite group, including Gary Player, Jack Nicklaus, Peter Thomson, Greg Norman and Jordan Spieth, as the only players to have won the title twice.

Amateur Takumi Kanaya (71) and Aaron Pike (69) finished tied for third at nine under, while Paul Casey (72), Greg Chalmers (67), Denzel Ieremia (71), Cameron Tringale (73) and Chun-An Yu (67) were a shot further back.

Henrik Stenson recorded his first tournament win in over two years as a stunning late eagle helped him clinch the Hero World Challenge on Saturday.

Top spot on a star-studded leaderboard changed hands on several occasions during a gripping final round, with Stenson making his move on the par-five 15th at the Albany Golf Club in the Bahamas.

The Swede came close to holing out his long-range approach shot to the green for an albatross, instead having to settle for a tap-in putt that moved him to 18 under par.

Three straight pars saw the 2016 Open champion sign for a score of 66, leaving him to watch on as those big names still out on the course attempted to catch him.

A fast-finishing Jon Rahm tried his best, an eagle of his own at the 15th sandwiched between birdies.

However, the Spaniard failed to pick up the shot he required over his closing two holes to draw level with Stenson, leaving him a shot adrift in second place.

Patrick Reed, who was handed a two-shot penalty during his third round after appearing to shift sand from behind his ball at the 11th hole, was along in third on 16 under, ahead of Tiger Woods.

A birdie at the seventh had Woods in front at 14 under but, after picking up another at the 11th, his hopes of victory were dealt a telling blow when he bogeyed the par-four 11th.

Justin Rose and Justin Thomas ended up tied together on 13 under, one clear of overnight leader Gary Woodland, whose topsy-turvy 73 included a double-bogey seven at the third.

There is a three-way tie at the top of the Mauritius Open leaderboard going into the final round after Saturday surges from Antoine Rozner and Thomas Detry.

Calum Hill had held a one-shot lead after 36 holes, but saw that advantage evaporate at Heritage Golf Club.

Rozner, who had been two off the pace, carded a six-under-par 66 that included an eagle at the fifth and moved him level with Hill, who went round in 68.

Only a birdie-birdie finish – the second a monster putt – kept Hill in a share of the lead at the end of a round in which he struggled to match the scoring he produced in his 64 on Friday.

"It was nice to have a couple of birdies to finish off and sneak back into a tie for the lead," Hill said in quotes reported the European Tour. "Happy with how it finished off. It was similar to my morning round [on Friday], wasn't much wind then either. The scoring was good out there if you played well."

Detry sunk seven birdies as he struck a five-under 67 to move to 16 under, with each of the trio eyeing their first win on the European Tour.

Rasmus Hojgaard and Sihwan Kim are a shot off the pace, with Renato Paratore and Brandon Stone a stroke further back.

Patrick Reed stressed he did not intend to improve his lie in a bunker at the Hero World Challenge after being awarded a two-stroke penalty.

The Texan was penalised for his actions on the 11th hole at the Albany Golf Club in The Bahamas, as video footage showed him twice hacking away sand during practice swings.

Golf's rules state that players cannot improve their ability to play a shot by "removing or pressing down sand or loose soil".

Reed was informed of the penalty shortly after his round, and the former Masters champion goes into the final 18 holes three shots back from leader Gary Woodland.

"It was in a full footprint and I felt my club was that far behind the ball when I was taking a practice swing," Reed said. "It was obviously hitting a bit of sand, though I didn't feel any drag.

"But when they brought it up for me [on the TV] I definitely saw it drag and, because of that, it is a two-shot penalty even though I didn't feel like it would have affected my lie.

"Every time I get in one of those bunkers I am scared to get my club close to it [the ball]. I accept the two-shot penalty, even though there was not any intent as I was far enough away.

"I think with a different camera angle they would have seen it was not improving the lie as I was far enough away from the golf ball.

"I don’t ever put the club directly behind the ball in a situation like that as I am scared of it moving. Intent is a big part but with only one camera angle it is a 50-50 battle when you are being assessed for anything like that.

"I told them there was no intent and it was far enough away from the ball, but they didn't have another camera angle to show that and they felt it might have been improving the lie.

"At the end of the day you have got to let things roll off your shoulders and I still have one round to play tomorrow. If I stew over something, it is my word against their word and because they only have one camera angle, I don't really have a choice.

"After seeing it brush some sand, they thought that was a breach and, in the Rules of Golf, if you improve your lie, it is a penalty. At the end of the day you have to accept it and move on."

Matt Jones moved a step closer to winning the Australian Open for a second time after extending his lead to three strokes at the end of the third round.

Jones entered the penultimate day with a one-shot advantage in Sydney, however, the Australian golfer moved clear on Saturday.

At The Australian Golf Club, 2015 champion Jones carded a three-under-par 68 to stretch his advantage heading into Sunday's final round.

Jones posted five birdies and two bogeys to end the day 13 under through 54 holes, ahead of American Cameron Tringale (69).

"I'm sure I can draw on it. I haven't won a lot of golf in my life," Jones told reporters when asked if having already won an Australian Open makes Sunday's round a bit easier.

"I've won the Houston Open, won a couple of other smaller tournaments and then the Australian Open, but it's only four years past and I'll draw on some of that experience tomorrow, of course."

Internationals Paul Casey (71) and Louis Oosthuizen (70), and amateur Takumi Kanaya, are four shots off the pace.

Gary Woodland ended a rollercoaster third round top of the Hero World Challenge leaderboard, but Tiger Woods moved further into position.

Patrick Reed had been three clear of the chasing pack through two rounds, yet his miserable Friday blew the tournament wide open in the Bahamas.

While a number of stars consequently had the opportunity to claim the lead, it was Woodland who moved into pole position thanks to drama that continued to the 18th hole.

Henrik Stenson had been two clear of a group of four in a tie for second when he birdied the 17th, only to see the tables turn at the last.

The Swede bogeyed for the first time all day, a four-under 68 dropping him to 12 under, as Woodland made gains on each of the final two holes.

The U.S. Open champion moved to 13 under, a stroke ahead of Stenson, who appeared to be level with Reed as play finished.

However, Reed, who made par at every hole on the front nine, before originally scrambling to a 72 with a birdie at the last, was handed a two-stroke penalty that amended his score to 74.

Reed twice appeared to shift sand from behind his ball at the 11th hole, and PGA Tour officials subsequently confirmed he had violated Rule 8.1a (4), which relates to "removing or pressing down sand or loose soil".

That leaves the 2018 Masters champion three back from Woodland.

Woods is well positioned, though, having fired again after a 66 on Thursday boosted him to within six of then-leader Reed.

The 15-time major champion carded a five-under 67 - with four birdies on the back nine - in an effort that was matched by Justin Thomas, also on 11 under in a three-way tie for third alongside Jon Rahm.

Justin Rose surged into contention with four birdies over the first six holes, but he tailed away to card a 71, leaving him seven behind Woodland.

Jordan Spieth belatedly moved under par for the week - two under - with a 69, while Bryson DeChambeau also shot his best round of the week, a 70, but remained over par.

Calum Hill produced an impressive round of 64 to move into a one-shot lead at the halfway stage of the Mauritius Open.

Starting on the back nine, the Scotsman registered seven birdies through 12 holes to push himself firmly in contention for a first tournament win on the European Tour in just his sixth start.

His rapid rise up the leaderboard hit a snag with a bogey at the sixth, though he gained that shot back at the next before finishing with another birdie at his last hole to reach 12 under par.

"The last couple of days the game has been nice. I managed to get the putter going well today, which added up to a good score," Hill told the European Tour's website.

Brandon Stone had finished the opening round in a five-way tie for top spot and remains in the running, the South African signing for a 67 to sit in a three-man group on 11 under.

He shares second place with Belgian Thomas Detry and France's Matthieu Pavon, the former aided by an eagle at the par-five 14th for a second successive day.

American Sihwan Kim and Scotland's Connor Syme sat a shot further back on 10 under, along with French duo Antoine Rozner and Benjamin Hebert.

Paul Casey surged into contention at the Australian Open as Matt Jones took a one-stroke lead at the halfway mark on Friday.

Casey fired a six-under 65 in the second round at The Australian Golf Club in Sydney to get to nine under and put himself in position for a third win of 2019.

The Englishman is tied for second with last year's runner-up Dimitrios Papadatos (66), the duo sitting a shot behind Jones (65).

Louis Oosthuizen, the 2010 Open Championship winner, carded a five-under 66 to be in a five-man group tied for fourth at eight under.

American Cameron Tringale (65), the world's top-ranked amateur Takumi Kanaya (69), Australian Shae Wools-Cobb (65) and New Zealander Denzel Ieremia (65) are also two shots behind the leader.

Marc Leishman sits in a tie for 12th at six under, while defending champion Abraham Ancer is a further two shots back.

However, 2009 champion Adam Scott missed the cut after failing to recover from his opening-round 75, shooting a 67 to finish even par and one stroke from making the weekend.

Patrick Reed carded a second consecutive 66 to move three shots clear at the Hero World Challenge as Tiger Woods surged into contention.

Reed had shared the overnight lead with U.S. Open champion Gary Woodland, whose run of three birdies to finish kept him in the hunt.

But 15-time major winner Woods was the big mover as he shrugged off Wednesday's erratic showing to close the gap to six strokes at the halfway point.

Defending champion Jon Rahm and 2016 Open winner Henrik Stenson are two shots better off than Woods, having signed for 66 and 67 respectively. 

Woods was blemish-free in round two, in stark contrast to the four bogeys and a double which spoiled Wednesday's 18 holes.

He felt the conditions made low scoring much easier and was pleased to take advantage.

"I think it was just less windy,'' he said in quotes reported by ESPN. "It was a little bit easier. Scoring conditions were a little bit better.

"I didn't hit the ball as well as I would like starting out... but I got it going on the back nine, which is nice.''

Five players carded rounds of 66 to share the Mauritius Open lead after Thursday's play.

Rasmus Hojgaard, Benjamin Hebert, Romain Langasque, Brandon Stone and Grant Forrest all finished six under.

A further nine players fared only one shot worse to leave the leaderboard tightly congested heading into round two.

Of the leading quintet, rookie Hojgaard was the only man to go blemish-free, with his impressive card also featuring an eagle at the seventh.

He and French duo Herbert and Langasque have never won on the European Tour, and the same applies to Forrest.

The Scot made gains at each of the par-fives, including a three at the 14th, and acknowledged how important those holes will be this week.

"The par-fives are key, they are all reachable," he told the European Tour website.

"You get the tee shots away there and there are really good chances, so you need to make the most of them."

Louis Oosthuizen and Paul Casey are among a congested chasing pack but it is a pair of amateurs who lead the way after round one of the Australian Open.

Japan's Takumi Kanaya, who four years ago shot 85 at the same course, and Chun An Yu of Taiwan each signed for rounds of 65 to lead at six under par in Sydney.

Both players noted just one bogey in their respective rounds to take a two-stroke lead from Matt Jones, Daniel Nisbet and Dimitrios Papadatos.

Oosthuizen and Casey are lurking in a pack of 15 players all three shots off the pace at three under.

South African Oosthuizen went blemish free through his 18 holes, while Casey was also without a bogey on his card having birdied the ninth and made eagle at the par-five 14th.

It was a day to forget for home favourite Adam Scott, though, as the 2009 champion went four over and faces a battle to make the weekend.

Tiger Woods fell away in the closing stages to end round one of the Hero World Challenge six shots adrift of joint leaders Gary Woodland and Patrick Reed.

U.S. Open champion Woodland and Reed led on six under par after shooting rounds of 66, with Chez Reavie two strokes off the pace in third position.

Justin Thomas, Justin Rose, Rickie Fowler and Henrik Stenson were all in contention on three under, with defending champion Jon Rahm one shot further back.

Woods, meanwhile, ended the day on even par in a tie for 11th place as he played for the first time since his win in Japan at the Zozo Championship in October.

Hosting the event at Albany, in the Bahamas, Woods selected the pairings and had many of his USA players for next week's Presidents Cup playing alongside each other.

It looked like Woods would end Wednesday's play in touching distance of the leaders after recovering from a two-over-par front nine to gain five shots in as many holes in a supreme stint, capped by chipping in for an eagle on the 15th.

But he dropped a shot on 17 and then three-putted on the last for a double bogey as he fell away.

Earlier, he had enjoyed an amusing moment with playing partner Thomas by mocking the length of the world number five's drive.

Woodland's impressive round in windy conditions included eight birdies to ensure he led the 18-man field along with Reed, who had four consecutive birdies on 13, 14, 15 and 16.

Reavie, a late replacement for Dustin Johnson, overcame a double bogey on the ninth to put himself firmly in the mix at an event which Woods has won five times, but not since 2011.

It was a day to forget for Tony Finau, with last year's runner-up recording a seven-over score of 79 that contained a triple bogey on the eighth to sit bottom of the leaderboard.

Tiger Woods believes golf can help to "heal" the issues that have led to criticism of Phil Mickelson's decision to play the Saudi International in 2020.

The introduction of the tournament to the European Tour calendar in 2019 was controversial due to Saudi Arabia's human rights record.

Dustin Johnson won the inaugural event, held from January 31 to February 3 this year, and will again play for the $3.5million purse next year.

World number one Brooks Koepka will also feature in the field and Mickelson's decision to skip the Waste Management Phoenix Open to join them has proved unpopular in some quarters.

Responding to critics on Twitter, Mickelson wrote: "After turning down opportunities to go to the Middle East for many years, I'm excited to go play and see a place in the world I've never been. I understand those who are upset or disappointed. You'll be ok. I'm excited to experience this for the first time."

Masters champion Woods will not be making the trip and, speaking ahead of the Hero World Challenge, he said: "I just didn't want to go over there - it is a long way to go.

"I understand the politics behind it. But also the game of golf can help heal a lot of that, too. It can help grow it [the game]. And also a lot of top players are going to be playing there that particular week.

“It's traditionally not a golf hotbed, the Middle East. But it has grown quite a bit. I remember going to Dubai for my very first time and seeing maybe two or three buildings in the skyline. Now there is a New York City skyline.

"Again, golf has grown. There were only a few courses when I went to Dubai and now they're everywhere. Same with Abu Dhabi, and maybe eventually in Saudi Arabia."

Jon Rahm has been named European Tour Golfer of the Year.

Rahm enjoyed a superb 2019, which he ended by winning the Race to Dubai with victory in the World Tour Championship last month.

He became the first Spaniard since the late great Seve Ballesteros to finish a year as European number one. 

Rahm prevailed in the Irish Open and Open de Espana as well as in Dubai, while recording two top-10 finishes at majors.

He was tied-ninth at The Masters and tied-third at the US Open, the latter performance at Pebble Beach marking his best finish at a major.

Rahm is the second Spaniard to win the award in the last three years, with Sergio Garcia having claimed it in 2017.

"It is a huge honour for me to be named the Hilton European Tour Golfer of the Year," said Rahm. "To emulate another of Seve's achievements in winning this award is very humbling, and I'm so proud of what I have achieved this year.

"To win both the Dubai Duty Free Irish Open and DP World Tour Championship for a second time, as well as defend the Open de Espana, were all incredible moments.

"But to finish the year as winner of the Race to Dubai is something I'm incredibly proud of achieving at this early stage in my career."

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