Jamaican Paralympic athlete Theador Subba eyes rare combination of judo and the javelin

By March 12, 2021

As a judo and javelin para-athlete, Theador Subba is a rare talent in the Paralympic and Olympic movements. 

The 2019 Lima Para Pan-American bronze medalist in the over 100 kg class, Subba, in achieving that historic feat, went beyond the incredible as he only started pursuing the sport of judo in early 2018.

That boldness of spirit drove him to take up the javelin in 2019 but he postponed his debut at the Para Pan-American Games to concentrate on judo, a decision which paid off handsomely.

Looking towards berths in both sports at the Tokyo Paralympic Games, Subba said the desire to represent his country fuels him. "The passion to represent my country, the will to succeed and the hope that I will be an example to others drive me, inspires me to pursue the two Js and to do well," he said.

An undergraduate Bachelor of Science Public Policy and Management at the University of the West Indies, Subba said his focus on his athletic and academic goals in unwavering. "I take life now seriously so that I can smile tomorrow with a career in one hand and medals in the other," he said.

Notwithstanding the challenges brought by the pandemic, Subba said his strategy to come is simple. "Train with your eye on the prize, rest well, then re-charge and go at it again with passion and perseverance," he said.

As the athletes intensify their training leading up to this summer’s Paralympics set for August 24 to September 5, JPA President Christopher Samuda believes athletes like Subba epitomize the Olympic ideal.

"In the Paralympic movement we remind each other that commitment and dedication to duty determine today's success and tomorrow's victory and that yesterday's lessons learned and applied to give enlightened vision to the future," he said.

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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