Ryan Foster, the Secretary-General and CEO of the Jamaica Olympic Association (JOA) will take on the additional role of Chairman of the Red Stripe Premier League’s Cavalier Soccer Club.

Foster, who is also President of Skateboarding Jamaica Limited and a director of the Jamaica Paralympic Association, brings a wealth of knowledge to the position of the club founded by the late national player and coach Leighton Duncan. Cavalier won the country’s top-flight league in 1981 and has a long and distinguished record in the country’s top flight.

“I am humbled to be appointed Chairman of this noblest club, Cavalier SC,” said Foster. “One of the first things I want to achieve along with the other executive members is to bring a sustainable corporate structure to the overall operation of the club, to develop a clear culture of goals and objectives that will be articulated in our operation and through our players and members of staff.

“Running a club in the RSPL is a difficult one if you are not nimble and flexible enough to monetise your assets and to find creative ways of generating sustainable revenues. This certainly has to be coupled with incentivising your players and coaching staff for performance on the field of play.”

Cavalier, which is characterised by its youthful influence and passing game, were finished eighth place in the 2019/20 RSPL standings,  two places outside the play-off spots – when COVID-19 forced a postponement and eventual cancellation of the season.

Foster noted the club’s strong technical capabilities, led by Rudolph Speid and their goal to fortify its structure.

“We have a strong technical team led by Mr Speid and now we have to develop a structure to support our technical play, but also one that encourages discipline, integrity, teamwork and fair play,” he stated.

 “No club in this league can survive without a strong development programme, (not only) through our youth system, but one that develops players who can matriculate to higher needs to not only benefit them but Cavalier.

“Looking forward to this task and I have always had a passion to help others achieve and self-actualise,” Foster underlined.

Speid, who served as the club’s chairman while serving the capacity as head of coaching for about a decade, explained their decision to add Foster to Cavalier’s team.

“It was a whole thrust for the company to broaden its management structure to ensure that we are keeping up to international standards and in line with what is required to move the club forward in a positive way to keep up with international clubs,” said Speid.

“By streamlining the club along with Mr. Thomas (Andrew), who is the president, we decided to bring in a chairman and then shift my responsibilities from being the chairman to become the Sporting Director.

“So because of his competences in business, sports and just generally what he has achieved for himself over the years, we thought he would be a good candidate to become the Chairman of our club,” Speid noted.

As a professional in business management, Foster is a former CEO of Tastee Limited, former Head of Business Development for Hardware & Lumber, former Treasury Operations Manager, First Global, the first Jamaican member of the Pan American Sports Organization (PASO) Finance Commission, Chairman of Wolmer’s Preparatory School, Chairman Express Canteen Services Limited and Chairman Cre8 Event Management Company.

“He will be concerned with governance, ensuring that our structures are maintained. We have different structures now, finance structure, marketing structure, technical structure, administrative structure,” Speid explained.

“We have been successful over the last couple of years and we wanted to improve on that as we go along. So those are some of the reasons we thought that he’d be a good Chairman. And then free me up to do different things as the past Chairman that will be more beneficial to the club,” he reasoned. “It’s really just trying to copy the best governance practices why we decided to go that route and we couldn’t find anybody more qualified than him.

 “What we’re doing is to give people more individual functions so they can focus. One of the reasons why we do it is to give players an opportunity too. We kind of paint ourselves in a storyline that is you want to play national football or go overseas Cavalier is the best place to come because we are geared towards that. That’s a storyline we want to keep so there’s all for a player who is very good and wants to go further,” Speid said.

“One of the biggest things about Cavalier is that there was a research done on all the professional clubs in the world and Cavalier was the ninth youngest professional club in the world, number one in CONCACAF.

“Once we segregate like we’ve done and give everybody different functions … it gives me more time so I can go away and get myself more educated in football,” said Speid. “This segregation is so key at this moment.”

 

Spinner Roston Chase made the breakthrough for the West Indies with the last ball before lunch just as England looked like negotiating the first hour of day one of the second Test in gloomy Manchester on Thursday.

The tourists' pacemen struggled to apply any pressure on England's openers as play began 90 minutes late and under lights at Old Trafford. Chase was handed the final over before the break by captain Jason Holder and trapped Rory Burns lbw for 15 with the second delivery.

Burns chose to review, but replays showed the ball was hitting the top of middle stump.

England went into lunch on 29-1 after 13.2 overs, a disappointing start to a tough morning for the hosts at least off the field.

England was without fast bowler Jofra Archer, who was excluded from the team for breaching isolation protocols by returning to his home in Brighton on Monday as the squad transferred from Southampton to Manchester. With James Anderson and Mark Wood rested for the match, England had a completely new specialist pace attack featuring Stuart Broad, Chris Woakes and Sam Curran.

Returning England captain Joe Root then lost a toss that was delayed because of wet weather, and Holder had no hesitation putting the English into bat even though no team has won on the eight occasions it has chosen to field first in a test at Old Trafford.

The radar of West Indies' fast bowlers was off, particularly Shannon Gabriel, who produced a comically bad first over that included five wides when one of his deliveries flew wide of the pitch and all the way to the boundary. Gabriel lost his run-up and had to abort his first delivery, and was wayward through most of his three overs.

Holder gave Gabriel and Kemar Roach only three overs each before removing the strike bowlers, but Burns and Sibley (8 not out) continued to be unflustered until Chase struck.

Chase was at it again just after the lunch interval, as Zak Crawley, fell to leg slip.

The West Indies, which named an unchanged team, won the first Test in Southampton and are looking to seal a first series victory in England in 32 years.

England selected Stuart Broad, Sam Curran and Chris Woakes in their side for the second Test against West Indies - but the much-changed bowling attack will have to wait for their chance to impress.

Jason Holder won a delayed toss and, under heavy skies in Manchester, opted to bowl first as West Indies chase a series-clinching victory.

While the tourists are unsurprisingly unchanged after their four-wicket triumph in Southampton last week, England have made four alterations to their team.

Joe Root - who missed the previous game due to the birth of his second child - returns to captain this side in place of Joe Denly, but England are without Jofra Archer, who was excluded from the squad following a breach of bio-secure protocols.

The pace bowler is to isolate for five days, during which he will undertake two COVID-19 tests. Both results need to be negative before his period of self-isolation is lifted.

Archer's absence was only confirmed on the morning of the Test, England having already announced on Wednesday that fellow pace bowlers James Anderson and Mark Wood would be rested at Old Trafford.

The uncapped Ollie Robinson misses out as Broad, Curran and Woakes get the nod.

"A statement has gone out this morning and as a side we've got to look at the next five days and put in a good performance to bounce back from last week," Root told Sky Sports after the toss.

The England skipper also confirmed that despite Archer being ruled out, there was no consideration to adding either Anderson or Wood to the 12-man squad.

"With both of those, having come back from two serious injuries, it seemed very high risk to play them in this game," Root added. "This is a must-win game for us, but we have to look after them."

Jofra Archer has been excluded from England's squad for the second Test against West Indies following a breach of the team's bio-secure protocols.

The pace bowler claimed match figures of 3-106 in the series opener last week in Southampton, a game the tourists won by four wickets to go 1-0 up in the three-match series.

England will aim to draw level in Manchester but Archer will not be in their XI as he isolates for five days.

The 25-year-old will also undergo two COVID-19 tests during that period, with both results needing to be negative before his self-isolation is lifted.

With both teams staying at Old Trafford as part of the measures put in place for the series due to the coronavirus pandemic, West Indies have been informed of the situation and are satisfied with the measures imposed.

"I am extremely sorry for what I have done," Archer said in a statement released by England ahead of Thursday's opening day of play.

"I have put, not only myself, but the whole team and management in danger. I fully accept the consequences of my actions, and I want to sincerely apologise to everyone in the bio-secure bubble.

"It deeply pains me to be missing the Test match, especially with the series poised. I feel like I have let both teams down, and again I am sorry."

England announced on Wednesday that James Anderson and Mark Wood will be rested for the second Test, meaning the former misses out on playing at his home ground.

With Archer also now out, Stuart Broad appears certain to be recalled. The home side drafted in left-armer Sam Curran and uncapped Sussex seamer Ollie Robinson to a 13-man squad which also included Chris Woakes.

Joe Root returns to captain the team after missing the opening Test due to the birth of his second child.

Shea Salinas scored a fine individual goal in the eighth minute of stoppage time as San Jose Earthquakes produced a stunning comeback to beat Vancouver Whitecaps 4-3 in the MLS is Back Tournament.

The Earthquakes trailed the Whitecaps 3-1 after 59 minutes in Orlando, Florida and were staring at their first Group B defeat on Wednesday.

But the Earthquakes – who drew their opening match – rallied midweek thanks to veteran striker Chris Wondolowski, Oswaldo Alanis and substitute Salinas' memorable 98th-minute solo run.

Opening their MLS is Back Tournament campaign, the Whitecaps made a fine start as they raced out to a 2-0 lead at Walt Disney World resort.

Ali Adnan's curled effort from the top of the penalty area put the Whitecaps ahead in the seventh minute before a Judson own goal following a swift counter-attack doubled Vancouver's lead 15 minutes later.

The Earthquakes gave themselves some hope on the stroke of half-time when Andres Rios reduced the deficit, only for Cristian Dajome to restore Vancouver's two-goal buffer approaching the hour-mark following a goalkeeping error.

Wondolowski came off the bench and kept San Jose in the contest with 18 minutes remaining – the league's all-time leading scorer improving his tally to 160.

The Earthquakes then drew level through Alanis nine minutes later before Salinas' moment of magic completed the breathtaking comeback.

James Anderson and Mark Wood have been rested by England for the second Test against West Indies, while Joe Denly has been dropped. 

The pacemen were part of the side that lost the series opener in Southampton last week but will not feature at Old Trafford, Anderson missing out on playing at his home ground.

With Anderson and Wood left out, Stuart Broad - a surprising omission from the line-up last week - looks set to earn a recall.

England have drafted left-armer Sam Curran and uncapped Sussex seamer Ollie Robinson into a 13-man squad as they strive to keep the series alive.

Another change sees captain Joe Root, who missed the opening Test due to the birth of his second child, return in place of batsman Denly.

Zak Crawley will move up a place in the order to bat at number three, with Root slotting back it at four.

England were unable to train outdoors on Wednesday due to bad weather, though Root has had a chance to look at the wicket as his side bid to level the three-match series. 

"I had a quick look yesterday – it has been under covers for the large part of yesterday evening and all of today," he told the media. 

"It looked like a good wicket and I’m expecting it to be just that really. Hopefully there is an opportunity for batters to go out there and make big scores, go on and convert some starts if we get in. With that, you want to see a bit of carry and bounce."

Meanwhile, Saqib Mahmood has left the Test party and will join up with England's white-ball training group on Thursday ahead of the home series against Ireland.

Jos Buttler has received the backing of returning England captain Joe Root, who is confident his team-mate can transfer his white-ball batting talents to Test cricket.

Wicketkeeper Buttler averages 31.46 in the longest format but has failed to get beyond 47 in his last 12 innings, a worrying slump in form that has seen his place in the team come into question, with Ben Foakes waiting in the wings.

The right-hander made scores of 35 and nine during the first Test against West Indies last week, with his second-innings dismissal coming during a collapse that swayed the game in the touring side's favour.

England lost at Southampton by four wickets but the under-pressure Buttler is set to keep his place for the game in Manchester, which begins on Thursday.

Returning skipper Root, who missed the series opener due to the birth of his second child, has seen technical improvements in Buttler's game to suggest a big score is just around the corner.

"I think you look at Jos and the game last week - and a I know we're in a results business and we're judged on performances - but you watch how he batted in that first innings and I thought, technically, it was as well as he's played in a long time," Root told the media on the eve of the second Test.

"His game is in a really good place, it's just a matter of time until we see some of those special innings that we've seen in white-ball cricket and his performances from that transfer across.

"He's someone that is a big part of our group – has been for a long time – and is a great thinker about the game. He's a big senior player in the dressing room across all formats.

"You feel he's not far away from grabbing Test cricket, taking it and running with it. I've seen big strides off the field with his technical game, I suppose you almost want him to find that balance and mindset he has in white-ball cricket and add it to a technique that can definitely thrive in red-ball cricket."

Root was a keen spectator back home as the action unfolded in Southampton, where all-rounder Ben Stokes took charge of the team for the first time.

The Yorkshireman admits it was not easy watching on afar when fully fit, though he saw enough from his players to suggest there are positive signs for the future, despite the result.

"It was challenging, more so because you're fully fit and could be out there, it's just a very strange set of circumstances," Root said.

"Ben as captain did a brilliant job. He had some very difficult decisions to handle and manage, and I think on the ground and throughout the game he managed things very well.

"One thing that I was really pleased with, actually, is the performance for the first two and a half days we were probably behind the game, but we managed to find a way of wrestling ourselves into a position where we could win it.

"In the past, sometimes we've fallen away a bit early, but going into those last two sessions we still had a chance at winning the game.

"In a way it was a small step forwards for us, though of course we couldn't quite get across the line.

"You look at the back-end of our second innings and that really did hurt us, but I think there were a lot of positive things to take from it. You could certainly see that, sat watching from home."

England have confirmed Root will come into the XI in a place of Joe Denly, while James Anderson and Mark Wood are both rested.

On the eve of the second #Raisethebat Test match between the West Indies and England and Old Trafford on Thursday, West Indies Jason Holder is backing Shai Hope to eventually come good with the bat.

West Indies captain Jason Holder has insisted the team is determined to keep both feet firmly planted on the ground, despite the historic opportunity of winning its first Test series, in England, since 1988, looming on the horizon.

The Windies recorded a four-wicket win over England in the first Test, in Southampton, to take a 1-0 lead in the three-Test series last week.  Should they be able to muster an identical result at the end of the second Test, in Manchester, Holder’s team will not just successfully retain the Wisden Trophy but do something no West Indian team has done in 32 years.

The captain, who has been quick to put down references to the team as the best in a generation, was just as quick to dismiss any hints of premature adulation or celebration.

“The series is still wide open.  There are 10 days of cricket left.  It’s one day at a time for us, England is a very good cricket team.  They have some world-class players, so we have our work cut out for us to win another match,” Holder told members of the media via a Zoom conference call on Wednesday.

“We don’t get too far ahead of ourselves.  This group to me has done just a good job not only for this series but in the last couple of years in terms of our results,” he added.

“Winning the first Test match is just one piece of the puzzle.  We have two other games we have to play, and we don’t get ahead of ourselves.  It’s the last thing we want to do in terms of getting complacent and getting too far ahead.  We start fresh with 10 solid days of cricket.”

England captain Joe Root has confirmed he will take Joe Denly's place in the side for the second Test against West Indies.

Root missed the first Test at the Rose Bowl – which the Windies won by four wickets – due to the birth of his second child.

However, the skipper has returned for the second Test, which starts at Old Trafford on Thursday, with the tourists aiming to secure their first series win in England since 1988 in the longest format.

Denly makes way, with the 34-year-old batsman having made 18 and 29 behind closed doors in Southampton.

With Root coming in at number four, Zak Crawley will move up to bat at three – the 22-year-old keeping his place in the side on the back of an impressive 76 in the second innings last week.

England have not confirmed the rest of the team, with Stuart Broad vying to be included after the experienced paceman was left out for the first Test.

Track and field legend Usain Bolt has revealed that he will not force his daughter Olympia into athletics, saying the pressure of living up to his legacy might simply be too much.

Phil Simmons has warned West Indies not to become complacent as they go in search of a long-awaited Test series triumph in England. 

The Windies were victorious by four wickets on the final day of a gripping first Test behind closed doors in Southampton. 

You have to go back to 1988 for the last time West Indies won a series on English soil in the longest format, but they have two opportunities to put that right at Old Trafford. 

Head coach Simmons says his players must focus on the job in hand when the second Test gets under way in Manchester, where Joe Root will return to captain England on Thursday. 

Simmons said: "For me it was a great win [in the first Test] because I think that it signified a lot of hard work being done by the players over the last four or five weeks. 

"But you don't come to England and just win a Test match. It was a top-class Test match, with good cricket played by both teams, and even coming down to the last hour, it could have gone either way. 

"To come out on top, it’s been great for us, and it was important because you don't want to have to chase England in England. So the chasing is from their point of view now. 

"But you guard against complacency by just trying to do the same things you did before the first Test. Right now, that Test match is history. We've got to be thinking about what we do from Thursday to Monday." 

Simmons thinks West Indies' preparation in the bio-secure bubble of Old Trafford paid off in the first Test. 

He added: "I think that has been the biggest influence on the performance. I think the fact that we've been here for that period of time, we've had quality bowling in the nets because we've had nearly 11 seamers here, you can't put a price on that. 

"I think that's something that we have to look at. I don't like to go back into my [playing] days, but we would come to England and play something like three or four proper warm-up games before the first Test, and we would also have three-day or four-day games in between the Test matches. 

"So I think that period of training goes a long way to how we performed in that first Test." 

West Indies coach, Phil Simmons, has admitted that a smidge of disappointment in an otherwise satisfactory victory over England lay in the fact that none of his batsmen was able to reach triple digits.

Returning Windies fast bowler Shannon Gabriel secured a 9-wicket haul, with Jermaine Blackwood crafting a well-earned and crucial second innings knock of 95 as the team registered a 4 wicket win for a 1-0 series lead in Southampton last week. Blackwood, who faced 154 balls and anchored the regional team’s innings, seemed well on the way to securing a second Test century, but was caught by James Anderson off the bowling of stand-in captain Ben Stokes. In the first innings, Kraigg Brathwaite battled to 65, with Shane Dowrich getting 61.

For the second Test, Simmons, who insists the Windies will have no room for complacency, pointed out that the aim is to see similar scores transformed to centuries.

“The fact that we had two guys getting 60s and a couple of guys getting 40s it was disappointing to not go on to score 100s. I like to see 100s on my scorecard at the end of an innings,” Simmons told members of the media via a Zoom conference call on Tuesday.

“I think that is one of the areas we need to improve on. If one of the guys who had scored 60 went on to score 100, the game might have been easier for us at the end, so we have to make sure that batsmen score big 100s and take games away from the opposition,” he added.

At the prompting of former Jamaica and West Indies batsman Lawrence Rowe, West Indies Captain Jason Holder has revealed that he intends to move higher up the Caribbean side’s batting order in the near future.

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