Erica Belvit heartbroken after missing out on Jamaican Olympic team despite winning national title

By July 08, 2024

Jamaican hammer thrower Erica Belvit has expressed her deep disappointment at not making the Jamaican team for the 2024 Paris Olympics, despite winning at the national championships just over a week ago. Belvit’s winning throw of 68.28m defeated Nayoka Clunis (66.63m) and Marie Forbes (63.14m), who finished second and third, respectively.

However, Clunis, having thrown a season’s best of 71.83m that exceeded the World Athletics 'B' standard of 70.00m, and who is ranked 25th in the world, has been selected for the Olympic team. Belvit, on the other hand, did not meet the B standard and is ranked 57th, rendering her ineligible for selection.

Taking to Instagram, Belvit shared her emotional journey and the challenges she faced this season.

“I don’t really have many words to describe this season other than ‘I tried my best’. Because I did,” Belvit wrote. “I came out of this season a National Champion, but I unfortunately could not put it together to qualify for the Olympics this year.”

The distraught hammer thrower revealed that her season was marred by a car accident just before it began, which resulted in her wearing a neck brace for nearly a month due to nerve issues in her neck and shoulders. Despite these setbacks, she persevered, balancing rest and training in an effort to reach her peak performance. However, time was not on her side.

“I tried so hard to allow my body the rest I could afford while continuing my training to the best of my ability. But the clock was running out and it became clear that my ‘best’ just wasn’t going to be good enough,” she lamented.

Belvit’s emotional struggle was palpable as she described the toll it took on her mental health. “I’ve never really thought of myself as a crier; this season broke that (and me) down for sure. I cried for and grieved this season for weeks; every single day. Woke up, crying. Falling asleep, crying. Before, during, and after trainings, crying. In airports, on planes, crying. Because I love to throw, and I couldn’t fathom that the dream I had to make it to this Olympic Games was dying right in front of me.”

The heartbreak was compounded by her exclusion from Jamaica’s team for the World Championships in Budapest last year, making the missed Olympic opportunity even more painful. “I felt like I needed to get there, especially after not being selected to go to Worlds last year,” she added.

Despite the setback, Belvit expressed gratitude to those who supported her throughout her journey. “Thank you to everyone who has shown support and love throughout this season and my entire career. Thank you to @wilfredo_dejesus for sticking with me through this season. Thank you to @rskim7296 at @reformpt_natick for your amazing work - I couldn’t have gotten back into competition shape this quickly without you. To the special few who spoke life into me and picked me up when I didn’t have strength, I love you.”

Looking ahead, Belvit remains uncertain about her future but is determined to take time to recover mentally. “I’m not really sure where I go from here; I definitely need some time to get my mental together. Only God knows what’s next,” she concluded.

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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